Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Global recognition for Kiwi-made intelligent textile

Media Release

Global recognition for Kiwi-made intelligent textile

Christchurch 13th November: A smart fabric developed by Christchurch company Footfalls and Heartbeats is gaining global recognition after a life jacket designed with the textile won a top prize in an international design competition.

The fabric, which measures breathing and heart rates, has been used in developing a concept revival vest for divers which responds to changes in bodily signs by inflating and taking the wearer to the surface in an upright position, ready for resuscitation. The vest won Victoria University industrial design graduate James McNab second equal placing in a global design competition run by the British-based James Dyson Foundation

Unlike other monitoring devices on the market, the ground breaking sensor material designed and developed by Footfalls and Heartbeats does not require wires, straps or miniature electronics. Instead, by using nanontechnology and textile structure, the company’s fabric is the sensor.

It is durable and comfortable to wear, working with the body and allowing maximum movement.

Footfalls and Heartbeats was founded by New Zealand chemistry researcher Simon McMaster and has received research and development funding from the government.

Auckland University of Technology and crown research institute AgResearch have both been involved in developing the fabric.

Start-up investment firm Pacific Channel, which works with inventors to create high growth companies, is currently completing a market assessment with Footfalls and Heartbeats and will soon be looking for commercial and other investment partners to take the start-up to the next level.

Pacific Channel Managing Director Brent Ogilvie says, ahead of capital raising for Footfalls and Heartbeats, the competition win confirms the strong market potential of the company’s world-class technology.

“There are opportunities to use Footfalls and Heartbeats’ unique fabric in a wide range of areas including medical devices, medical monitoring during tests like electrocardiograms, infant monitoring, pressure sensing in wheelchairs and beds, and performance monitoring for top athletes,” says Ogilvie

One early application is expected to be compression bandages for use on diabetic ulcers.

“Footfalls and Heartbeats is an example of the growing number of high calibre and innovative companies being established in New Zealand that we are working with,” says Ogilvie.

Simon McMaster says seeing the fabric gain a top placing in the prestigious James Dyson competition is fantastic news for the company.

“It’s great to see word getting out about our novel and truly intelligent fabric.”
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Tax: GST Threshold For Online Purchases Won't Lower Before 2018

The government wants to lower the threshold on online purchases which qualify for GST from mid-2018, but says more work is needed and there will be no change without public consultation. More>>

ALSO:

North Canterbury: Government Extends Drought Classification

The government has extended a drought classification for the eastern South Island until the end of the year, meaning the area will have officially been in drought for almost two years, the longest period for such a category. More>>

ALSO:

Negotiations Fail: Christchurch Convention Centre Build To Proceed Without PCNZ

After protracted negotiations, the government has ditched the construction consortium it picked to build Christchurch's replacement convention centre, which it now anticipates delivering at least two years behind the original schedule. More>>

ALSO:

Ruataniwha: Greenpeace Launches Legal Challenge Against $1b Dam Plan

Greenpeace NZ is launching a legal challenge against a controversial plan to build a dam that’s set to cost close to $1 billion and will pollute a region’s rivers. More>>

ALSO:

Inequality: Top 10% Of Housholds Have Half Of Total Net Worth

The average New Zealand household was worth $289,000 in the year to June 2015, Statistics New Zealand said today. However wealth was not evenly distributed, with the top 10 percent accounting for around half of total wealth. In contrast, the bottom 40 percent held 3 percent of total wealth. More>>

ALSO:

What Winter? Temperature Records Set For June 20-22

The days around the winter soltice produced a number of notably warm tempertaures. More>>

Conservation Deal: New Kākāpō Recovery Partnership Welcomed

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says the new kakapo recovery partnership between DOC and Meridian Energy is great news for efforts to save one of New Zealand’s most beloved birds. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news