Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Outdoor Pursuits Centre gets hooked up to broadband

19 November 2012

OPC gets hooked up to broadband

Combined effort overcomes one of New Zealand’s biggest connection challenges

It had to be one of the most challenging broadband hook-ups in New Zealand, but the Tongariro OPC base finally has fast and reliable internet access.

Previously, the remote 40-year-old base of the Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre of New Zealand (OPC) had to rely on a slow and patchy satellite connection for internet access.

But this year, a combined effort from OPC and its long-time sponsor Genesis Energy, with the support of the local Huckleberry’s Sports and Charitable Society, brought broadband to the staff at Tongariro.

“OPC is blessed to be based in one of New Zealand’s most beautiful wilderness areas, but the remote location does have its challenges,” says OPC chief executive Graham Seatter.

The base is in the heart of the Tongariro National Park, about 25 kilometres from the nearest town and four kilometres from the nearest state highway, so getting hooked up to broadband internet was a logistical, technical and financial challenge.

“We have a very remote location at Tongariro and the cost of getting a unique connection to our site was prohibitive, so we had to find a different solution,” says Graham.

“Fortunately, our long-term supporter Genesis Energy had broadband internet connections in the area serving the Tongariro Power Scheme, so with a bit of technical nous and financial support from them, we were able to get hooked up.

“Without Genesis accommodating us on their existing internet hardware it would have been extremely expensive.”

As well as allowing OPC to piggyback on its connection, Genesis supported in a number of ways including project managing the hook-up.

“Genesis is a great partner of OPC in so many ways,” says Graham, “and in this project they made a major contribution in what is a very significant development for OPC.”

Another key financial supporter was the Huckleberry’s Sports and Charitable Society, a local trust that has given OPC valuable support in recent years.

OPC’s Auckland-based IT support company, Analogue Ltd, also helped to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges.

“Having broadband has changed the world for our staff at Tongariro. They have joined the 21st century,” says Graham.

But this doesn’t mean that the thousands of school students who visit OPC every year will be spending their wilderness time on their mobile phones and tablets.

“Although our students will benefit indirectly from the broadband connection, part of the OPC experience is appreciating life without digital distractions, and we’ll keep it that way,” says Graham.

About OPC

The Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre of New Zealand has been built on the legacy of Sir Ed and Graeme Dingle nearly 40 years ago. Education is still being valued as OPC’s primary benefit during the rich outdoor learning experiences:

Contributing positively to the life journey of young people through adventure and rich outdoor learning experiences that develop care and respect for self, others and place, in the spirit of Sir Edmund Hillary.

OPC’s school programmes are about ‘seeking summits’ on many levels. OPC develops tomorrow’s leaders by building spirit, a strong sense of group unity, camaraderie and valuable socials skills that last a lifetime in unique and unspoiled New Zealand settings.

Programmes take place at OPC centres in Tongariro and Great Barrier Island, as well as nationwide events including the Genesis Energy Hillary Challenge for senior students (year 12 and 13), the YouthTown Get2Go for junior students (year 9 and 10), and NavQuest for all secondary school level students, their families and interested public.

For further information please visit


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Health: New Zealand's First ‘No Sugary Drinks’ Logo Unveiled

New Zealand’s first “no sugary drinks logo” has been unveiled at an event in Wellington... It will empower communities around New Zealand to lift their health and wellbeing and send a clear message about the damage caused by too much sugar in our diets. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news