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Comvita 1H earnings fall 7.4% amid short supply of honey

Comvita first-half earnings fall 7.4% amid short supply of Manuka honey

Nov. 21 (BusinessDesk) - Comvita, which sells products based on the health and medical benefits of honey, posted a 7.4 percent decline in first-half profit , saying a shortage of Manuka honey after an inclement 2012 summer constrained sales growth and margins.

Profit fell to $2.39 million, or 7.95 cents a share, in the six months ended Sept. 30, from $2.58 million, or 8.92 cents a year earlier, the Te Puke-based company said in a statement. Sales climbed to $45.4 million from $41.8 million.

The year-on-year result would have been a gain in profit but the year-earlier numbers were restated for what Comvita said were errors in the accounting treatment of acquisition costs in its apiary business. The amendments didn’t change the full-year result of $8.2 million, a figure the company expects to better in the current year.

“Comvita historically has a year of two halves with the second half year sales and profits significantly stronger than the first half,” said chairman Neil Craig. “We expect this to be the case again this financial year as Asian sales continue to grow strongly.”

Trading activity in China, South Korea and Hong Kong, where Comvita mainly operates a direct-to-consumer retail business, “has been especially strong,” the company said. “Still, in non-Asian markets such as Australia and the UK, “the trading environment has been relatively tough.”

“The other factor that has been a constraint on sales growth and margins during this first half year is the short supply of our key ingredient, Manuka honey,” it said. “The honey crop from last summer was well below average, due to generally inclement weather during the summer of 2011/2012, resulting in a sharp increase in the purchase price for new season honey.”

To limit the impact of price fluctuations, the company is seeking direct ownership of more of its honey supplies. It now has four apiaries in the North Island, which supply about one third of its honey requirements.

The company will pay a first-half dividend of 4 cents a share. It didn’t pay a dividend in the first half of last year. Its shares last traded at $3.70 and have gained 50 percent this year.

This time last year it rejected a $2.50-a-share takeover offer from Cerebos New Zealand, a unit of Singapore-listed Cerebos Pacific.

“We remain confident that both top line and bottom line growth can be achieved for this fiscal year and beyond,” said chief executive Brett Hewlett.

(BusinessDesk)

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