Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Chinese visitor rise offsets fall in October vs RWC crowds

Chinese visitor rise offsets fall in tourist numbers from 2011 RWC spike

By Paul McBeth

Nov. 22 (BusinessDesk) - A steady increase in the number of Chinese visitors offset a fall in overall tourist arrivals last month, compared with the spike in arrivals last year for the Rugby World Cup.

The number of short-term arrivals fell 15 percent to 184,200 in October from the same month in 2011, and was down 0.6 percent on an annual basis, according to Statistics New Zealand. The monthly slump was due to the country being flush with visitors for the showcase rugby event in October 2011, with the biggest declines coming from Australian, British and South African visitors.

Asian short-term arrivals were the only region to gain in the month, led by a 44 percent jump in Chinese visitors to 15,344. Chinese short-term arrivals were up 39 percent to 53,884 on an annual basis.

New Zealand's tourism has struggled to recover from the global financial crisis in 2008 as rising long-haul travel costs and a resiliently high local currency tarnished the appeal of the South Pacific as a destination.

The rise in Chinese tourist arrivals chimes with a report this week from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and the Tourism Industry Association of New Zealand predicting a structural shift in the composition of tourism arrivals.

“Traditional markets like the United Kingdom and United States will continue to decline in the absence of any active market intervention, but this will be off-set by strong growth from China and Australia," the report said.

“New Zealand will face continuing challenges as a destination for traditional markets, due to the global financial crisis and emergence of low-cost European airlines. The forecasts provide encouragement for New Zealand’s tourism industry to do more to attract and cater for visitors from our Asia-Pacific neighbours.”

Today's figures showed an increase in net long term migration of 300, seasonally adjusted, with a net loss of 2,300 on an annual basis.

The diaspora to Australia continued in October, with 3,315 kiwis crossing the Ditch for a net outflow of departures versus arrivals from Australia of 2,576. That took the annual number of departures to 48,657, with a net loss to Australia of 39,363.

(BusinessDesk

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: