Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ dollar rallies as US Black Friday spending buoys stocks

NZ dollar rallies in NY as US Black Friday spending buoys stocks

Nov. 26 (BusinessDesk) – The New Zealand dollar rallied to a month high in New York trading on early signs that US consumer spending picked up on so-called Black Friday that follows the Thanksgiving Day holiday, helping stocks gain and lifting risk appetite.

The kiwi dollar traded at 82.28 US cents this morning from 82.40 cents in late New York trading on Friday and up from 81.63 cents in Wellington at the end of last week. The trade weighted index was at 73.65 from 73.68 in New York and up from 73.27 in late New Zealand trading on Friday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose about 1.4 percent on Friday for a 3.3 percent weekly gain. Online retail sales in the US on Friday rose 26 percent to US$1.04 billion, according to comScore. The National Retail Federation predicts sales during the holiday season increased 4.1 percent this year, down from last year's 5.6 percent growth.

“Early indications around retail spend in the US is that average spend is up,” said Alex Sinton, senior dealer at ANZ New Zealand. “Equities are up on the back of that.”

Helping set a positive tone for growth-linked currencies such as the kiwi, the Ifo institute's business climate index for Germany unexpectedly rose, climbing to 101.4 in November from 100 in October, the first increase in eight months. Meantime there’s optimism Greece’s lenders will agree to the next tranche of funding for the debt-ridden nation.

The New Zealand dollar traded at 63.46 euro cents from 63.49 cents and traded little changed at 51.33 British pence. The kiwi fell to 78.65 Australian cents from 78.74 cents and traded at 67.75 yen from 67.85 yen.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Food: Govt Obesity Plan - No Tax Or Legislation

Speaking to Q+A’s Corin Dann this morning, health minister Jonathan Coleman said tackling obesity was at the top of the Government’s priority list, but there was “no evidence” a sugar tax worked, and further regulation was unnecessary. More>>

ALSO:

Treasury Docs On LVR Policy: Government Inaction Leads To Blurring Of Roles

The Treasury wouldn’t have had to warn the Reserve Bank to stick to its core functions if the Government had taken prompt and substantial measures to rein in skyrocketing Auckland house prices, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Final EPA Decision: Tough Bar Set For Ruataniwha Dam

Today’s final decision by the Tukituki Catchment Board of Inquiry is good news for the river and the environment, says Labour’s Water spokesperson Meka Whaitiri. “Setting a strict level of dissolved nitrogen in the catchment’s waters will ensure that the dam has far less of an impact on the Tukituki river." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news