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TEAR Fund New Zealand Announces New CEO

November 26th 2012

TEAR Fund New Zealand Announces New CEO

TEAR Fund New Zealand today announced that it has appointed Ian McInnes as Chief Executive Officer.

Mr. McInnes, (42), will take up his position as CEO of one of New Zealand’s leading aid and development organisations on February 4th 2013.

McInnes said, "I am deeply honoured to be chosen to lead TEAR Fund, a hugely respected and admired humanitarian organisation. I am passionate about extending our ministry to the poor, oppressed and disadvantaged and to encouraging New Zealanders to engage with those in need.”

Most recently, McInnes was Acting International Policy and Programmes Director at World Vision New Zealand. Specialising in humanitarian response management, disaster risk management, monitoring and evaluation in fragile countries, Ian’s career has seen him living and working in Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Haiti, Pakistan and Samoa. As on an-call disaster expert, Ian moves between managing international aid responses in the developing world to overseeing and monitoring the appropriate use of funds from the developed world.

TEAR Fund Chairman of the Board, Gary Agnew said, "Ian is a well-known, visionary leader, committed Christian and is passionate about helping children and the poor. The Board unanimously agreed that Ian’s unparalleled track record in aid and development work and leadership skills made him the right leader for TEAR Fund at this time of enormous opportunity”.

McIness becomes the fourth CEO of TEAR Fund since its founding in 1975.

About Tear Fund
Tear Fund is New Zealand’s Leading Christian Aid and Development Organisation. We’ve been working in close partnership with local Christian non-government organizations and churches in Asia, Africa, Central and South America for the last thirty five years. We actively change the lives of the poor and oppressed through disaster relief, community development and child sponsorship. Assistance and care is always provided without bias or prejudice in terms of race, religion, caste, class, political beliefs or gender.


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