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Auckland calls for 2013 major events

26 November 2012

Auckland calls for 2013 major events

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) is calling for applications from interested parties looking for sponsorship of major events in Auckland.

The annual baseline sponsorship window is open from today until 5pm 21 January 2013. Applications are open to any major event proposed to be held in Auckland between 1 July 2013 and 30 June 2014.

This year, Auckland has hosted a series of world-class events including Volvo Ocean Race Auckland Stopover 2012, ITU World Triathlon Championships 2012, World Rally Championship 2012 and stage show Mary Poppins.

Jennah Wootten, General Manager Destination (Acting), says major events are key to driving economic growth in Auckland, benefiting businesses, residents and visitors.

“Our goal is to build Auckland into a global events destination resulting in economic benefits for the region, while also shaping it to be a more interesting and vibrant place for its residents.

Our ability to successfully stage major events has been recognised internationally with Auckland finishing in an impressive second place in the prestigious Sport City Award 2012 at the International Sports Event Management (ISEM) Awards in London earlier this month”.

A total of $2.1 million was budgeted for the 2013/14 sponsorship window, of which $477,000 is available. Priority will be given to those events that present the strongest alignment to Auckland’s Major Events Strategy, a document which provides a framework to evaluate major events and develop a portfolio to help the region achieve both its economic and social aspirations.

Decisions about successful sponsorship will be released between April and June 2013.

Visit www.ateed.co.nz/sponsorship to complete the online application form, download terms and conditions and the summary of the Major Events Strategy.

ATEED (Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development) is a council-controlled organisation tasked with the attraction and sponsorship of major events in Auckland, as well as focusing on the region’s economic wellbeing and marketing of Auckland as a destination.

ENDS

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