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Environmental Focus Driving Kiwi Mower Technology

November 27, 2012

Environmental Focus Driving Kiwi Mower Technology

A move by some local councils to adopt international standards which will help drive organic refuse out of household waste collections, is being supported by a leading gardening tools manufacturer.

In some instances councils plan to offer a new collection service for organic waste (such as food scraps and garden refuse) which will be subsidised by rates.

Masport General Manager Steve Hughes says he's unsurprised by the trend which has been reflected in 25% growth in sales for lawnmowers that can do more than cut and catch grass in the past 12 months.

Hughes says mowers that can help mulch grass to very small, fine particles and then spread out and recycled back into the grass are in high demand.

"Mulching retains nitrogen and moisture in the ground, meaning that gardeners are not only left without refuse to get rid of but they don't have to water their lawns as often in summer."

"For a more serious gardener who has hedges, shrubs and flower beds that need pruning and cutting, we now have mowers with a chipper attachment so branches and trimmings can be thrown in as you go," he says.


Both of these mower systems mean less refuse at the other end for consumers to dispose of, he says.

Hughes says that in Australia, most local councils offer incentives to households to recycle their green waste appropriately - using initiatives such as special collection days and special collection bins which are available to domestic households at a reasonable yearly rate.

"It's great that households are becoming so much more environmentally-aware now and concerned about how they're getting rid of their green waste. This is something that fits in with our clean, green Kiwi culture and I believe councils here are slowly but surely listening to the ratepayers and looking at incorporating the same initiatives in New Zealand," he says.


Hughes says it is only a matter of time before this becomes a reality in New Zealand and that Masport is continually innovating to keep up with the changing needs of consumers in this environmentally dynamic market.

Masport Mower

-Ends-

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