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Kia aims to be premium brand

Kia aims to be premium brand

Kia has set itself a goal of becoming a premium automotive global brand within the next five years.

That target was revealed by Kia Motors Vice-Chairman Lee Hyoung-keun at a gathering of the company’s top worldwide dealers and distributors.

Mr Lee says Kia Motors is on track to build its brand power to be on a par with European and Japanese automakers within five years, as it develops ever-more sophisticated vehicles that customers will aspire to own.

By attaining continuous sales growth and reinforcing global sports marketing at the up-coming 2014 FIFA World Cup football tournament, Kia is seeking to enter the list of “first-class brands” by 2017, adds Mr Lee.

He confirmed that Kia Motors has set itself a target of exporting 2.21 million units to overseas markets in 2012, which would represent an 8.3% increase over the 2.04 million units sold outside of Korea last year.

Kia’s increasing brand profile is being built on the back of stylish new models like the Optima mid-size sedan, the recently revised Sorento R and its all new premium flagship, the Quoris, which is currently being introduced to markets around the world.

While Kia Motors has been among the fastest growing car brands in the last decade, it has stated that future growth will be more moderate and its priority is to further lift the quality and technology of its products, which in turn, will also improve brand perception.

Todd McDonald, General Manager of Kia Motors New Zealand, was among the delegates at the four-day conference and says it was an extraordinary gathering.

“It was inspiring to witness the unveiling of a programme that will see the Kia brand continue to reach new levels over the next five years,” he says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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