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‘Royal’ Salmon, King of the Plate this December

Media Release
3 December 2012

‘Royal’ Salmon, King of the Plate this December

Few species can say their common name sounds like royalty, but December’s Fish of the Month, King Salmon, can claim just that. And with good reason.

Being one of ‘seafood sovereignty’, King Salmon is highly versatile. It can be pan-fried, baked, barbequed, or even served raw as sashimi. It comes in whole fillets or steaks, and in a variety of pre-packed smoked options such as fillets, slices and pieces. It is great with breakfast, lunch or dinner - as a snack, finger food, entrée, or as the key ingredient to a fantastic meal.

Much like royalty, King Salmon is regarded for its exceptional rich taste. It has a beautiful full-flavour and soft delicate 'melt-in-your-mouth' texture. Its high protein content also makes the average cost per serve comparable to other meal options.

Being a readily available super-food, it’s packed full of health benefits and is a good source of Omega-3. Evidence suggests Omega-3 plays an important role in human health and can assist to reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

King Salmon is one of New Zealand’s farmed seafood species. Marine farming is also known as ‘aquaculture’. New Zealand operates one of the strictest quality assurance programmes for marine farming in the world, and as a result, our clean coastal waters produce great tasting salmon.

This month, make King Salmon the king of your plate, with our great recipe and meal ideas such as salmon, citrus and fennel parcels – great on the BBQ - just in time for Christmas at: www.seafood.co.nz/recipes

www.fishofthemonth.co.nz


Questions and Answers

What is Fish of the Month?
Fish of the month is a promotional programme managed by Seafood New Zealand which focusses on one seafood species per month, providing key information on taste, texture, nutrition and sustainability of the seafood species in New Zealand www.fishofthemonth.co.nz.

Who is Seafood New Zealand?
Seafood New Zealand is an industry body that promotes New Zealand seafood, representing and supporting seafood companies, retailers, iwi groups, and individual fishers primarily through five sector-specific entities: aquaculture, paua, rock lobster, deepwater and inshore finfish. For more information about Seafood New Zealand, visit our corporate site: www.seafoodnewzealand.org.nz

ENDS

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