Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

TPP: Australia and NZ Agricultural Bodies Call For Action

MEDIA RELEASE
FREEPHONE 0800 327 646 I WEBSITE WWW.FEDFARM.ORG.NZ
__________________________________________________________________

4 December 2012

TPP: Australia and New Zealand Agricultural Bodies Call For Action On Trade

The peak agricultural bodies of New Zealand and Australia have united in calling for a truly comprehensive and generally liberalising Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement from day one of implementation.

Federated Farmers of New Zealand and the National Farmers’ Federation of Australia are both participating in the TPP negotiations, currently taking place in Auckland.

“Liberalisation must result in the elimination of all agricultural and food product tariffs and reform non-tariff measures,” says Bruce Wills, President of Federated Farmers of New Zealand.

“If we want to get trade going, especially by small and medium sized agri-business enterprises, then we need all the blocks to free trade removed.

“This outcome must match the political ambition for the TPP.

“Australia and New Zealand want an agreement that is truly 21st century in coverage and design, setting the benchmark for future multilateral, regional and bilateral trade agreements,” Mr Wills said.

Jock Laurie, President of the Australian National Farmers’ Federation, added that from an agricultural perspective, “market access is the core deliverable; agriculture needs to be at the heart of negotiations and the result is a net and sustainable creation of jobs.”

Both national farmers’ organisations also support conclusion of the negotiations in 2013.

“From our perspective, genuine agricultural trade liberalisation in the TPP context is highly important to the agricultural sector’s future prosperity and competitiveness,” Mr Laurie continued.

“A free trade outcome is needed to drive resource efficiency needed to meet the growth of global demand for food and fibre off the back of an increasing world population.

“Improving diets driven by increasing consumer affluence means availability and affordability both become essential criteria in meeting food security needs,” Mr Laurie said.

The New Zealand and Australian agricultural community welcomes additional members into the TPP, provided there is a genuine commitment to open their respective markets and removing behind the border impediments to trade in agricultural and food products.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Water: Farming Leaders Pledge To Help Make Rivers Swimmable

In a first for the country, farming leaders have pledged to work together to help make New Zealand’s rivers swimmable for future generations. More>>

ALSO:

Unintended Consequences: Liquor Change For Grocery Stores On Tobacco Tax

Changes in the law made to enable grocery stores to continue holding liquor licences to sell alcohol despite increases in tobacco taxes will take effect on 15 September 2017. More>>

Back Again: Government Approves TPP11 Mandate

Trade Minister Todd McClay says New Zealand will be pushing for the minimal number of changes possible to the original TPP agreement, something that the remaining TPP11 countries have agreed on. More>>

ALSO:

By May 2018: Wider, Earlier Microbead Ban

The sale and manufacture of wash-off products containing plastic microbeads will be banned in New Zealand earlier than previously expected, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO: