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Deloitte to merge with Rotorua-based Hulton Patchell

Media release

5 December 2012

Deloitte to merge with Rotorua-based Hulton Patchell

Bolsters Maori sector expertise and extends Central North Island reach

Professional services firm Deloitte announced today that it will be expanding its capability in the Maori Services sector and extending its reach into the Central North Island when it merges with the Rotorua’s leading professional services firm, Hulton Patchell on 1 March next year.

The Hulton Patchell team of 3 partners, and 20 other professionals and staff are all based in the firm’s Rotorua office and includes principals Murray Patchell and John McRae who will become partners in Deloitte with Ian Hulton, taking well deserved retirement.

Deloitte Chief Executive Officer, Thomas Pippos, said the move was an exciting one for Deloitte, and was a direct response from focussing on the needs of the market.

“We are already seeing an increasing demand for assistance from Maori organisations whose needs for professional services advice can be varied and complex so it made sense to bolster our resources in that area.

“From a Deloitte perspective we further strengthen the services we provide by augmenting our existing national Maori Services team and by having an on-the-ground office servicing the Central North Island.

“We are delighted to join forces with Hulton Patchell - a firm whose values, culture, operations and service quality is already aligned with our own.”

Murray Patchell said the firm decided to join Deloitte to offer clients and staff the benefits of increased efficiencies and access to Deloitte’s pool of national and global expertise.

“Merging with Deloitte gives us the capability and resources to help our clients with solutions to their increasingly complex needs. It also means we are well placed to continue growing our business and provide the best opportunities for our staff,” he said.

Ian Hulton was proud that the firm that he founded had continued to grow and succeed to a level that it could merge with Deloitte.

“It’s an exciting time for Hulton Patchell to take the next step and be able to be part of Deloitte,” he said.

Hulton Patchell will continue to operate out of its Rotorua office with the merger effective as of 1 March 2013.

-ends-

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