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Wellington Primed for Pride In Print Awards


Wellington Primed for Pride In Print Awards

Pride In Print is set to put the “bling” back into Wellywood when its Award Night is held in the on Friday May 3.

Traditionally, Award Night is both the showpiece where the cream of New Zealand’s print expertise is rewarded, and the fun night where printers, suppliers and customers let their hair down in celebration.

This year, the siting of Award Night at the TSB Arena, nestled on the harbour a stone’s throw from the Capital City’s CBD, is guaranteed to provide a popular setting for both the glamour side of the evening and the fun part.

The flavour of the night is captured by Mark Stocker, Managing Director of Kurz Australia, a major international supplier of hot stamping technology which has just come on board as a new sponsor for Pride In Print in 2013.

“The whole awards night is a good reflection for not only the printers but also the suppliers to stand up and pat themselves on the back for the thankless work they do.

“Suppliers deliver high-quality materials and ongoing support to enable their customers to produce work to a standard that can compete with their peers in business, and be rewarded for their skills.

“The night also is a great reflection of supplier-printer relationships and teamwork, working together to reach a common goal, as well as a great opportunity to reflect on the pressures of the printing industry.”

Awards Manager, Sue Archibald, said the evening was set to be a huge social success. “The venue is walking distance from major hotels and is also only a short distance from Courtenay Place, a traditional venue for after-function celebrations to continue. Check out the website www.prideinprintawards.co.nz for the deals we have been able to secure at the Ibis Hotel for $119 per night!

“For the dinner and the Award presentations themselves, the tables, seating arrangements and stage all proved to be very good when we were last in Wellington for the 2011 Awards. We are expecting the venue to go down well with guests.”

The theme of the night will be a continuation of the “Print Out Loud” campaign which proved successful in Auckland last year, and Sue Archibald says that the print industry needs to go hard to make the Awards a glowing tribute to the quality that New Zealand print can produce.

“We have pushed to make the voice of print be heard among print buyers and among New Zealand business as a whole. But we cannot do it alone. Printers need to do their bit.

“They need to select entries which scream out the message ‘this is a showstopper’ … jobs which are outside the box

“The time is now for printers to find their voice, and make themselves heard. Then Pride In Print can showpiece your examples of excellence.

“Remember - success in Pride In Print opens doors for more work with current and future clients. Winners find the competition provides an invaluable benchmarking opportunity, showing their quality to be higher than the competition and providing downstream benefits in the marketplace.

“So now is the time to get entries in and to share in the rewards.”

Early bird entries for Pride In Print close on December 21 and regular entries close on January 31. Close off for late entries is February 28.

Entries are welcome from any person or company associated with the production or purchase of print. Entries must have been printed in New Zealand between January 1 and December 31 and can be from any printing process.

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