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NZ Winegrowers explores the science of Sauvignon blanc

New Zealand Winegrowers explores the science of Sauvignon blanc

New Zealand Winegrowers (NZW) has commissioned UK wine writer Jamie Goode to publish The Science of Sauvignon blanc. The book is based on the results of a six year multidisciplinary research initiative that explores the key aroma and flavour compounds in Sauvignon blanc wine and how they relate to viticulture and winemaking.

"In our research programme we wanted to understand the unique characters of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc" says Dr Simon Hooker, General Manager Research at New Zealand Winegrowers. "What are its sensory attributes? Can they be linked back to viticultural management? Are they generated in the vineyard, through winemaking processes or by the yeasts? This book presents an overview to these questions in a very user friendly way that has given the industry new tools for driving flavour".

The New Zealand wine industry relies on research leading to technical innovation to enable winemakers and grape growers to stay ahead in a competitive world. Research on Sauvignon blanc is vital if New Zealand is to maintain its current leading position and reputation with this variety. Although most of the lessons learned in the book are specific to Sauvignon blanc, the underpinning information is relevant and transferrable to other grape varieties.

The Science of Sauvignon blanc is an output of the New Zealand Winegrowers levy-funded research programme. It has been published as a resource for the industry and has been sent to all NZW members. Due to a limited print run, there are a small amount of books available for purchase. Please contact simon@nzwine.com for more information.

Jamie Goode is a wine writer with a scientific background. After completing a PhD in Plant biology he worked for 15 years as a science editor. As an enthusiastic wine drinker, in 2000 he started the wine website www.wineanorak.com, which led to a career as a respected freelance wine journalist.

New Zealand Winegrowers work to ensure its levy-funded research programme provides and promotes a technological basis for the New Zealand grape and wine industry to remain internationally competitive as the leading producer of premium quality wines.

ENDS

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