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Bigger Payout Means More Will Shop At Field Days

Bigger Payout Means More Visitors Will Head To Field Days To Shop – President


A higher dairy payout means more farmers will be spending more money at the 2013 Northland Field Days in February according to Northland Field Days president Lew Duggan.

Fonterra lifted payout predictions for the end of this season from $5.25kg/MS to $5.50kg/MS also increasing 2012-2013 season to $5.90-$6.

While he says many farmers will be keen to pay down debt that extra cash should also flow through to more spending at the Northland Field Days February 21-23.

“Farmers tend to save up big purchases for the field days to take advantage of time and money saving opportunities at the event,” says Duggan “2013 should definitely reflect that with the higher payout.”

An Enterprise Northland commissioned AUT Economic Impact Study discovered that in 2008 1250 people surveyed specifically went to the field days to buy something with spending averaging out at $738 per visitor including food and accommodation.

Duggan attributes this to specials offered up at the event and the ability to talk to a lot of retailers at the same time.

“How many other times are there in the year when a farmer will have all the dealers in one small place?” asks Duggan. “It's a huge time saving opportunity and to make matters better most dealers save up some of their best specials for this time.”

Oakleigh dairy farmer Murray Byles has been going to the Northland Field Days for the past 20 years because of the savings available and the proximity of dealers."Dealers generally offer Field Days specials out there so if I'm going to buy anything I'll do it then," says Byles. "And it's in the second half of the season when you generally know where your finances are at. Byles usually goes with something in mind, in 2011 it was a quad causmag grass seed spreader."I was able to go round everybody who had spreaders and get prices," says Byles. "If it were any other time it would have taken a couple of days but they're all there."

The Northland Field Days will be held from February 21-23 in Dargaville, two and a half hours North of Auckland. For more information call Meagan on 09 439 8998, email info@northlandfielddays.co.nz or visit the website http://www.northlandfielddays.co.nz

ENDS


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