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Air New Zealand names new Chief People Officer

Media release

18 January 2013

Air New Zealand names new Chief People Officer

Air New Zealand has appointed Lorraine Murphy as Chief People Officer, effective March 4.

Ms Murphy is currently based in the United States where she was most recently Vice President Human Resources – International for Campbell Soup Company, which has more than 20,000 employees globally and sales in excess of US$8 billion annually. Her role provided leadership across key geographic regions, such as Asia Pacific, Europe and Latin America.

Ms Murphy had previously held senior human resource leadership roles with Lion Nathan Australia, the Australian Gas Light Company (AGL) and global chemical company ICI.

Air New Zealand Chief Executive Officer Christopher Luxon says Ms Murphy was appointed after an extensive global search to find a Chief People Officer who could work with his senior leadership team to enhance the world class capabilities and culture within the award-winning airline.

“People are Air New Zealand’s greatest asset and Lorraine has proven through her extensive international career the ability to work with senior managers to deliver world class performance cultures and build winning teams. Her exposure to operating in markets of critical importance to Air New Zealand’s future, especially in Asia and the Pacific, will add significant strength to our airline in this next exciting phase,” Mr Luxon says.

Ms Murphy says she is privileged to have been appointed Chief People Officer.

“Air New Zealand is a remarkable company that has earned a world-class reputation based off the unique spirit and attitude of its people. Its transformation over the past decade is one of the great business stories and I am thrilled to be given the opportunity to work with Christopher and his senior leadership team to further enhance the performance culture and brand of this iconic company,” she says.

Ms Murphy is an Australian citizen with US residency who has a Bachelor of Education degree from La Trobe University in Melbourne and an MBA from Monash University in Melbourne.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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