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An insatiable appetite for media

Media Release

23rd January 2013
An insatiable appetite for media

KPMG research released at the Davos World Economic Forum in Switzerland has revealed a global insatiable appetite for media. The growing desire for digital content does not appear to be at the expense of ‘old’ media.

Consumers are splitting their time between traditional and digital media, but spend more money on traditional media.

People still spend marginally more time offline than online. However, 70 percent feel the choice of digital content is wider, and more than half say they have greater access to online media. Nevertheless, consumers continue to devote a higher proportion of their monthly expenditure to traditional media – particularly to TV/video and live events.

Spending on online media has risen in the past year. For every type of digital media, more respondents increased their spend than decreased it. In contrast, certain types of old media saw a net decrease in expenditure, namely packaged forms like CDs, DVDs, and video games.

TV remains the most popular media activity. However, a relatively high proportion of consumers (for example, over 30 percent in Singapore and 14 percent in the US) now prefer to watch TV via their mobile or tablet. And with a growing preference for streaming TV and video online, the next generation of consumers will seek a more mobile TV experience.

Traditional advertising may be diluted. Television is no longer a single experience as ‘digital multi-taskers’ interact with tablets and smartphones while simultaneously watching TV. Media companies may attempt to tap into these ‘second (and third) screens' through social media, but such integration is only partial, and consumers’ attention is diverted away from the ads that fund most traditional broadcast content.

ENDS


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