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Music Students Can Hit New Notes

Waiariki Institute of Technology
Mokoia Drive
Rotorua, New Zealand
0800 924 274

24 January 2012

Music Students Can Hit New Notes

Waiariki Institute of Technology has been approved by New Zealand Qualifications Authority to deliver a Certificate in Contemporary Music Performance during 2013.

With the Waiariki Academy of Singing and Music operating during the last two years, Waiariki’s first Music specific offering through an articulation agreement with Tai Poutini Polytechnic will be delivered in Rotorua and allow music orientated students to actually study and pursue a career in the musical industry.

Respected musician and Waiariki Academy of Singing and Music manager Richard Anaru will head the certificate programme.

“This is just what we wanted to do,” says Mr Anaru. It’s targeted at students who want to further their musical knowledge and grounding to continue in the industry”.

Mr Anaru believes there is an amazing array of musical talent in the region and the opportunity to enhance that with a qualification would allow musical minded students a foot up in to the industry.

“It’s exciting this all about studying today’s music and all musical genres. As part of their assessments the students will put on a concert every four weeks using the genres they have studied,” says Mr Anaru.

The program runs across 34 weeks and students will learn how to make a record, gain performing skills, write a song, about the best musical style for them, music theory, instrument study and professional opportunities.


ENDS

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