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New Company to Take Wind Power into Next Century

New Company to Take Wind Power into Next Century

A WIND energy company will change the way that people look at windpower according to company directors.

The start up New Zealand company, Pacific Wind, is distributing a new type of wind turbine, developed recently in America, called INVELOX which keeps the turbine on the ground rather than in the air.

A funnel draws wind down into the generator where it is converted into electricity.

The innovative design means generators work off less than a quarter of the wind using towers half as tall producing power for lower cost with Pacific Wind executive vice president Reza Sehdehi calling it the most exciting thing to happen with wind generators since the early 1900's.

"Wind technology hasn't changed in the last hundred years," says Reza. "We have changed the technology."

After being sucked into the funnel the wind is allowed to contract and expand as it travels through pipe towards the generator and Reza says this plays a big part in the generator's efficiency.

The generators are able to keep working with winds traveling at 3.2 KPH while traditional generators require winds of 14 KPH to work.

Putting the generator on the ground also means machines are easier to service, don't generate the same amount of noise and are safer than traditional wind turbines. This allows them to be put in a lot more places says Reza.

"You can put them anywhere where there's even a little bit of wind," says Pacific Wind Associate Executive and Northland farmer, Bob Bull. "They can be put beside commercial buildings, on farms, you could even use them beside shopping malls to generate power for the mall."

Local systems are now in place. Bull, says we have received a lot of interest from a lot of players in industries.

Bob says that people will be able to see the generators for the very first time at the Northland Field Days from February 21-23 in Dargaville.

“We are really excited about introducing people to this groundbreaking technology for the very first time.”


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