Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Fonterra units hold up in early trading, despite DCD scare

Fonterra units hold up in early trading, despite DCD scare

By Pattrick Smellie

Jan 28 (BusinessDesk) - Fonterra Shareholders Fund units took a small, immediate knock as trading opened on the NZX this morning after a weekend in which international media latched onto the news that small traces of a nitrate inhibitor had been found in some Fonterra milk powder.

FSF units dropped 0.41 percent, or 3 cents, to $7.20 at the open of NZX trading, and bid and ask prices were displayed briefly as low as $7.14 and $7.18 before recovering to a range of $7.20 and $7.23 in the first 10 minutes of trading and appeared to be holding those levels.

Global investor reaction may yet occur in other markets, although the Australian Stock Exchange is closed today for a national holiday long weekend.

Despite assurances the levels of the chemical, known as DCD, are far below European Union food safety thresholds, the incident has produced scare-mongering reports which Fonterra will now have to work hard to counter.

Prime Minister John Key used his weekly morning radio slot on Newstalk ZB to label some international media reports as "misinformation" after highly reputable sources such as the Wall Street Journal website headlined reports with the question" "Is New Zealand milk safe to drink?"

''The situation here is that there is no health risk, at all," he said. "Key told Newstalk ZB he would be concerned if international consumers reacted to ''misinformation''.

''The situation here is that there is no health risk, at all," he said, echoing comments by Fonterra chief executive Theo Spierings, who issued media statements over the weekend to try and reassure export markets.

''Once you get these sort of stories written, even if they're incorrect, it's a big job to close them down," said Key.

Theo Spierings said reactions were ''way out of proportion''.

Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas produced by grazing stock and accounts for around 16 percent of the country's annual emissions contributing to climate change. DCD has been used by some farmers to limit such emissions, with nitrogen inhibitors being one of the few technologies currently available to farmers to cut emissions, which in total account for around half New Zealand's total annual GHG emissions.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Skodafone Goneski: Sky TV, Vodafone Drop $3.44 Billion Merger Plan

Sky Network Television and Vodafone New Zealand have terminated their merger agreement which aimed to create the country's largest telecommunications and media group, and have withdrawn an appeal against the Commerce Commission's rejection of the plan. More>>

Quake Insurance: Reforms To EQC Act Announced

· Increasing the monetary cap from $100,000 (plus GST) to $150,000 (plus GST) for EQC building cover.
· Clarifying EQC land cover is for natural disaster damage that directly affects the insured residence or access to it... More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank: Official Cash Rate Unchanged At 1.75 Percent

Global economic growth has increased and become more broad-based. However, major challenges remain with on-going surplus capacity and extensive political uncertainty... More>>

Kaikōura Earthquake: Private Insurers Receive $1.8b Claims

Insurance Council Chief Executive Tim Grafton said most is for commercial loss at $1.36 billion, with residential claims amounting to over $460 million. “...We have a high level of confidence that most people will have received settlement offers by the end of this year." More>>

ALSO:

Forms And Data: New Proposals To Simplify Personal Income Tax

The Government is proposing to make tax simpler for individuals, with people whose only income is from a salary, wages or investments no longer being required to file tax returns to receive tax refunds or to calculate any additional tax. More>>