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Bluebridge Passengers to Surf While They Sail - for Free

Media release
For immediate release
Tuesday 29 January 2013

Bluebridge Passengers to Surf While They Sail - for Free

Passengers crossing Cook Strait on Bluebridge ferries can plan their holiday itinerary, post Facebook updates, tweet, email, shop and surf the web, on the company’s new free Wi-Fi available on all sailings from tomorrow (Wednesday 30 January).

Strait Shipping’s New Zealand owned and operated Bluebridge, which already offers customers free on-board movies, kids’ play areas and private cabins, is set to be the only Cook Strait ferry offering year-round free Wi-Fi to passengers on-board its ferries and inside its terminals.

“We’re always looking at ways to improve our passenger experience, and what better way to kick off the New Year than with a little something extra for our passengers,” says Strait Shipping managing director Sheryl Ellison.

“We know many of our customers want to stay connected – whether they’re at home or in the middle of the Cook Strait – and we want to help them do that. Free Wi-Fi gives our passengers another great reason to travel with us.”

Ms Ellison says the free wireless is aimed both at the domestic market – with almost half of New Zealand’s population over 18 online shoppers - and the international visitor.

“We’re expecting our international passengers to use the Wi-Fi to book activities and accommodation and make forward travel plans – which will also benefit the wider tourism sector.”

Free Wi-Fi will be available from tommorow, Wednesday 30 January, in Bluebridge terminals and all on-board passenger areas with a Wi-Fi logo. The inaugural Wi-Fi sailings will depart Wellington at 1.30pm and Picton at 2pm.

Large 3G aerials have been fitted to the Bluebridge ferries, which send signals to the wireless access points fitted across the vessels. Speeds will vary depending on usage and because the service relies on the 3G mobile phone network, there is a possibility that coverage may drop out due to atmospheric conditions and signal strength on occasion. If this happens customers will be advised to try again in around 15 minutes.

“Getting online will be a simple process,” says Ms Ellison.

“But any passengers needing help can ask any member of our friendly frontline staff.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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