Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Employers Urged To Remember Sun Safety Responsibilities

MEDIA release
31 JANUARY 2013

Employers Urged To Remember Sun Safety Responsibilities

With New Zealand having one of the highest rates of melanoma in the world, people who work outdoors are being reminded to protect themselves as they have a higher risk of developing skin cancers.

With 15% of New Zealand’s workforce working outdoors, it is important that employers and workers understand why it is important to minimise sun exposure in outdoor workplaces.

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s Health and Safety Operations General Manager Ona de Rooy says that employers have a responsibility to take all practicable steps to protect their employees.

“This means they should be reminding their workers who spend long periods outside about sun protection and to keep hydrated,” says Ms de Rooy.

“Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun is the main cause of skin cancers in New Zealand. As we all know the greatest risk of being harmed takes place during late morning and early afternoon in the summer months - a time when many outdoor workers are at their busiest.

“Employers are also required to ensure that information is provided to employees about identified hazards, including the risks caused by UVR, and the steps to be taken to minimise the sunburn and dehydration,” Ms de Rooy says.

Cancer Society Health Promotion Manager Dr Jan Pearson says the best way to protect skin is by covering up with appropriate clothing, a hat and sunglasses, using sunscreen on exposed skin and seeking shade when possible.

“Over 400 New Zealanders die from skin cancer every year. The good news is that with some thought and preparation, the risk can be significantly reduced if we are SunSmart,” Dr Pearson says.

“As well as taking steps to protect their skin and eyes, outdoor workers should make a conscious effort to get any change in their skin including spots, moles or freckles checked by their GP alongside any other health concerns. More than 90% of cases of skin cancer can be cured if the disease is caught early.”

People especially at risk include:
• agricultural, farming and horticultural workers
• building and construction workers
• council workers
• dockyard, port and harbour workers
• fisheries workers
• forestry and logging workers
• labour hire company workers
• landscape and gardening workers
• mining and earth resources workers
• outdoor events workers
• physical education teachers and outdoor sports coaches
• police and traffic officers
• postal workers
• road workers
• surveyors
• swimming pool and beach lifeguards
• taxi, bus and truck drivers and delivery and courier service workers
• telecommunications and utilities workers.

Note to Editor
• A fact sheet on skin cancer can be found on MBIE’s website
• Employers and employees can get SunSmart workplace material on the Cancer Society website.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news