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CRP Expands Board With Three New Directors

1 February 2013

CRP Expands Board With Three New Directors

Chatham Rock Phosphate is appointing three new directors who will contribute valuable expertise and experience to the company in the run up to applying for a marine consent later this year and on-going financing of operations.

They are senior Royal Boskalis executive Ko de Blaeij, marine mining entrepreneur Robert Goodden and eminent ocean scientist Dr Robin Falconer.

This is the first stage of enlarging the board to reflect the advancement of the project and will supplement the skills of existing directors Jill Hatchwell, Linda Sanders and Managing Director Chris Castle.

Mr. Castle said he was delighted with the strong technical and commercial knowledge the three new directors would contribute.

“All are already closely associated with the project. Robin’s knowledge of Chatham Rise rock phosphate goes back to the 1970s and he has been central to the operational success and the milestones we have achieved. Robert has had a lifetime working in the marine mining industry and has introduced us to hugely valuable international contacts. Ko has been a key sponsor within Boskalis and a staunch advocate since the start of the company’s involvement as our partner.”

Ko de Blaeij has worked for Boskalis since 1980 on a vast array of projects all over the world including France, Britain, Australia and Nigeria as well as within the Netherlands.

Until recently he has been Director of Boskalis Offshore guiding offshore pipeline and platform contracts in countries like Norway, Russia, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, India, Indonesia and Australia. In 2012 he became Director of Boskalis International in the Middle East. He has had a strong interest in the Chatham project over the past two years and is looking forward to the new role.

Robert Goodden is a member of the technical advisory team for CRP. He chairs Subsea Minerals, developing business opportunities in marine mining (not associated with CRP cornerstone shareholder Subsea Investments) and before that as Chief Executive worked on a surf zone marine mining project off the coast of Namibia. He was previously on the advisory board for Nautilus Minerals advising on core drilling and sample recovery.

He founded Seacore Limited, a world class marine drilling and marine construction specialist in 1976 and ran the company for 30 years. During the mid 1970s he developed a world-first underwater core drilling machine based on tension leg platform principles. He holds a first class degree in mining engineering and was a commissioned officer in 39 Engineer Regiment.

Robin Falconer (PhD, BSc-Hons, BSc) has over 35 years experience in geosphere, atmosphere, and ocean science surveys and research as a university lecturer, government scientist, consultant, industry employee and research group manager; in New Zealand and internationally.

The work has included marine mineral and oil exploration, seabed surveys, weather analyses, oceanography, environmental studies, Geographic Information Systems, and computer mapping. He has worked at sea off New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific, New Caledonia, China, Antarctica and the Arctic; for New Zealand, US, Canadian, Australian, SE Asian, German and UK companies and research institutes.

He has several years accumulated at sea experience on a wide range of industry and research institute vessels. He is Chair of GEBCO, the joint International Hydrographic Organization and UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission organisation that coordinates world ocean bathymetry mapping.

In marine minerals Robin has worked on offshore exploration projects for gold, chromite and phosphate. He has over 70 scientific/technical reports and 40 refereed publications, plus conference and seminar presentations.

Dr Falconer is consultant Chief Scientist for Chatham Rock Phosphate Ltd. He provides input on the practical and management aspects of marine operations including general seabed, oceanographic and environmental mapping; and technical input on all aspects of the project.

The appointments take immediate effect.


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