Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Strong line-up of speakers for NZ Transport Summit

Strong line-up of speakers for NZ Transport Summit

5 February 2013

Two further industry leaders have been confirmed as speakers for The New Zealand Transport Summit, bringing a strong line-up of sector leaders to Wellington for the February 18-19 summit.

Emirates Airline Senior Vice President, Andrew J Parker, will give a presentation on international aviation trends. Mr Parker, based in Dubai, is responsible for the airline’s public, international and industry affairs, and its environment activities.

Tourism Industry Association CEO, Martin Snedden, will take a session on the role of tourism in the economy and its impact on transport. Mr Snedden is the former CEO of the company responsible for staging the Rugby World Cup and former head of New Zealand Cricket.

The summit’s theme – Driving Economic Growth – will be addressed by a wide range of speakers including Secretary-General of the OECD’s International Transport Forum, José Viegas, who will speak about international transport trends and innovations.

National Infrastructure Coordinator of Infrastructure Australia, Michael Deegan, will talk about how the public and private sectors can best work together to optimise the use of the transport system to support economic growth.

Lowy Institute for International Policy Director, Mark Thirlwell, will take part in two panel discussions looking at economic aspects of global trade trends and local infrastructure development.

New Zealand’s Minister of Transport, Gerry Brownlee, will give the summit’s opening address. New Associate Transport Minister, Michael Woodhouse, will give the closing address.

Ministry of Transport Chief Executive Martin Matthews says New Zealand is geographically remote. “There is a great deal of blue space between us and our export markets.

“So how do we create a more integrated, connected transport system that optimises market opportunities for trade and enterprise? The summit will be a key forum to discuss these challenges and focus on meeting our future needs.”

The summit sessions will include: the linkages between the economy and transport and New Zealand’s place in world trade; international shipping and aviation trends and their influence on New Zealand; transport infrastructure – investment, funding and industry collaboration; and how New Zealand should position itself in global supply chains.

The summit will be held at Te Papa Museum, Wellington. Registration costs $1,295 + GST.

Further information can be found at www.transportsummit.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news