Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Voting opens in forest referendum

FOREST GROWERS LEVY TRUST MEDIA RELEASE
28 February 2013


Voting opens in forest referendum

Polls in the Forest Voice referendum will be open from 1-29 March, a week longer than originally intended.

The organisers, the Forest Growers Levy Trust, say this will make voting more convenient for the many forest growers who live in districts where on-line voting is not possible, because of difficulties with internet access.

Trust chair Geoff Thompson says that if the referendum is successful, a small levy on harvested logs will be used to fund work that benefits all forest owners.

“Forestry is one of the few primary industries not to have a levy to fund research, bio-security surveillance, communications, advocacy and product promotion. For an industry with more than 10,000 growers – the country’s third largest export earner – this is long overdue.

“Growers who vote ‘yes’ will be voting to create a more profitable, better coordinated and fairer industry. I strongly urge every eligible grower to have their say and register to vote.”

The referendum gives each owner of a qualified forest one vote that will be counted two ways, per head and by area of forest. A dual majority is needed for the referendum to succeed.

In order to vote you need to own or represent the owner of a 'Qualifying Forest'. This is a plantation which has a stand or stands of trees 10 or more years in age (planted before 1 March 2003), totalling at least four hectares in area.

This definition applies to all species grown for eventual harvest including wildings and regeneration of a planted stand of trees. Christmas trees and trees grown for domestic firewood are not included.

“The 10-year cut-off ensures the right to vote is limited to those who are likely to pay the levy during its six-year life,” says Mr Thompson.

Voter registration and voting is now open [subs: From 1 March]. Potential voters need to go to the Forest Voice website or phone the organisers to check their eligibility and register as a voter.

Voting will now run until 29 March. Votes may be cast on the Forest Voice website or in the traditional way, on a ballot paper which may be posted or faxed.

For details, visit www.forestvoice.org.nz

[ends]

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news