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EECA Business To Help Auckland Airport Achieve Energy Vision

EECA Business To Help Auckland Airport Achieve Energy Vision

Auckland Airport today signed up to the EECA BUSINESS Energy Management Programme, with EECA Programme partner ECOsystems, to help it achieve a 20% reduction in energy use per passenger by 2020.

The programme is part of Auckland Airport’s continued drive to reduce energy consumption and its associated environmental impacts and costs. The programme will see Auckland Airport partner with EECA BUSINESS and ECOsystems to establish a formal energy plan.

Judy Nicholl, Auckland Airport General Manager of Aeronautical Operations, says belonging to this energy management programme will add a fresh impetus to a rolling programme of improvements managed through an Energy Conservation Group.

“Auckland Airport’s Energy Conservation Group, which includes staff, as well as representatives from Siemens and ECOsystems, was established to ensure the company maintained a strong focus on the reduction of energy consumption. The group has a primary goal of reducing Auckland Airport’s energy consumption by 20% per passenger by 2020.”

“Although our goal of 20% reduction in energy use per passenger by 2020 is setting the bar high, we have already seen some outstanding successes. Energy consumption was reduced by 6% last year in the “green” part of the international terminal, Pier B, merely through optimising existing equipment,” finishes Judy.

Siemens NZ CEO, Paul Ravlich, says the Airport was an excellent candidate for energy efficiency gains. “It’s a massive operation with many different functions which present major opportunities for energy savings. But it’s also great to be partnering with the Airport to create a comfortable environment for passengers, Airport staff and retailers at the terminals.”

“Buildings consume around 40% of all global energy costs,” continues Mr Ravlich. “So efforts to increase efficiency in this area contribute significantly to the sustainable use of energy resources.”

EECA BUSINESS Commercial Programme Manager Karen Chaney says significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial buildings through improving the efficiency of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting systems.

“To realise these savings it is important to make energy management part of day-to-day operations. Our programme helps to do this by incorporating energy management into business plans and processes.”

The EECA BUSINESS funded programme will formalise Auckland Airport’s energy policy and plan and assist in verifying cost and carbon savings over the coming three years.

Frans Plugge, Executive Director of ECOsystems, says “This is a unique opportunity to make a real difference on a large scale and we really look forward to working with the team at Auckland Airport to make this a showcase site.”

Auckland Airport, together with specialist energy efficient lighting company, 0800SaveEnergy, was rewarded for their dedication to reducing energy consumption with a prestigious lighting engineering award in November last year.

Presented by the Illuminating Engineers Society of Australia and New Zealand, the award was for a “smart” lighting project which resulted in an impressive 72% reduction in lighting energy consumption in the international terminal check-in area.

Auckland Airport sign energy efficiency partnership with EECA, Ecosystems, Siemens and 0800SaveEnergy.

ABOUT EECA BUSINESS

EECA BUSINESS is part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority. They make the decision to invest in energy efficiency easier by providing relevant, accurate information and connecting businesses with energy efficiency experts, who give practical advice, and provide access to funding. To find out more visit www.eecabusiness.govt.nz.

ENDS

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