Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

New Technology to Light Skate Park

New Technology to Light Skate Park

Thursday 28 February –Hastings green space William Nelson Park will benefit from intelligent LED lightening, thanks to a partnership between the Hastings District Council and Hawke’s Bay electricity distribution company Unison Networks.

The partnership will see Unison install innovative lighting technology as part of the Councils development of William Nelson Park that will include 4000sqm of passive park green space and a 2000sqm skate facility for the Hastings community.

Unison Group Chief Executive Ken Sutherland said the new lighting system would provide multiple benefits to park users, rate payers, and the Council.

“The intelligent Phillips lighting solution enables customised control of lighting levels and includes automated fault monitoring. This means lighting levels can be programmed to meet requirements at different times. For example, brighter lighting will be provided during winter evenings for safe skating purposes, and lighting levels will then be dimmed during later night hours to save energy while still maintaining public safety.”

The system features a fault diagnostics system that will identify and report any light outages, removing the requirement for manual monitoring, or community reporting of lighting outages. The monitoring and control software provides a system override function to enable lighting levels to be instantly increased in response to an emergency.

“LED lighting also provides a range of benefits including greater energy efficiency, a significantly longer bulb life than conventional lighting technologies, and delivering a better quality of white light that renders rich colours with contrast enabling safer night time activities such as skating, driving or pedestrian movement,” said Mr Sutherland.

Hastings Mayor Lawrence Yule said Council was excited to partner with Unison and Philips to bring an innovative approach to public lighting.

“This lighting project presents a fabulous opportunity, benefiting skate park users through the delivery of a tailored lighting solution. The white lighting will bring colour to the city providing greater user enjoyment, increasing public safety, ensuring increased energy efficiency and providing better lighting reliability.”

-Ends-

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: