Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

DOC confirms new structure


DOC confirms new structure


The Department of Conservation says additional funding has enabled it to build more than 60 additional frontline roles into the new structure it is adopting to deliver conservation.

DOC has been consulting with its approximately 1800 staff since first proposing changes for its operational arm over a month ago. Today it outlined the department’s final decisions to staff around the country.

Deputy Director-General Doris Johnston says the simpler regional structure and strengthened field teams will enable DOC to continue with its own work and also develop new conservation partnerships with others.

Doris Johnston says the new structure will streamline the department’s current 11 Conservancy districts into six new conservation delivery regions.

It will also create two distinct teams across the country: one focused on delivering DOC’s recreation, historic and biodiversity field work; and another working to develop new conservation initiatives in partnership with other organisations.

Doris Johnston says Budget funding announced last week has enabled an additional 41 field-based ranger roles and 22 visitor information and support positions to be added to local offices.

Details of the new structure and how it translates into local office teams will be available from midday on DOC’s website: http://www.doc.govt.nz/docchanges

Doris Johnston says the final structure has 72 fewer full time roles across the country than is currently the case. This is largely the result of changes to local management structures where two management layers are replaced by one, supported by senior rangers.

Doris Johnston says the new structure will take effect in September and DOC will be working with affected staff over coming months on options such as redeployment, relocation or redundancy.


–Ends–

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: