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New head of ATEED corporate relations


Media release
24 June 2013

New head of ATEED corporate relations

Communications consultant and strategist Steve Armitage has been appointed Head of Corporate Relations at Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED).

Steve Armitage starts at ATEED on 1 July, moving from his role with respected public affairs consultancy Three Point Two Communications, and says he is enthusiastic about the new challenge.

“ATEED is entering a dynamic period, with a newly re-focused structure designed to drive export-led economic growth and attract investment for Auckland. This complements an established portfolio of great major events and a solid destinations programme,” says ATEED Chief Executive Brett O’Riley.

“Steve’s role will focus on developing wider integrated communications and engagement in the collaborative spirit of kotahitanga. Under Steve’s leadership, Corporate Relations will champion a diverse range of initiatives with our broad range of partners including Auckland Council, other CCOs, local boards, central government, iwi, industry organisations, media and other external customers.”

Steve Armitage says he has enjoyed his five years at Three Point Two Communications, and the challenge of growing a successful company alongside business partner Barry Ebert. “The company is flourishing and I am appreciative that the experiences gained in the private sector have given me a deep understanding of the competitive commercial environment which will be invaluable in my new role at ATEED,” says Steve Armitage.

Prior to his time at Three Point Two Communications, Steve Armitage worked in political advisory roles for the Government.

Brett O’Riley says Steve Armitage’s appointment strengthens the public reporting side of the business.

“Steve will be a big asset for ATEED. He is one of a younger generation of multi-skilled professionals emerging in Auckland who will drive the region’s future as the ‘super city’ matures,” says Brett O’Riley.

“He has worked with ATEED on a number of important projects and is an experienced operator.”

Ends

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