Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Equal pay for work of equal value -There is a case to answer

Media release: Pay Equity Challenge Coalition
Monday 24 June, 2013

Equal pay for work of equal value – there is a case to answer

The Pay Equity Challenge Coalition is paying close attention to the historic equal pay case underway in Auckland today and scheduled to run until Wednesday.

Spokesperson Angela McLeod believes there is a case to answer: “The aged care workforce in New Zealand is overwhelming female and many, like Kristine Bartlett, earn the minimum wage or close to it. Pay rates this low do not reflect the value of the work.”

“Caring for others has historically been seen as “women’s work” and has always been underpaid and often unpaid. The case will examine whether Kristine Bartlett is being undervalued and paid too little because she is doing what is considered to be “women’s work”.

“There is no reason why “women’s work” should be remunerated at a lesser rate than “men’s work”. This case will finally open the door for equal pay in New Zealand.”

“The Equal Pay Act 1972 was passed to legislate for equal pay regardless of gender – it’s well overdue to start looking at gendered pay structures in more depth,” McLeod says.

“The court must use the Equal Pay Act to decide, if aged care were a male dominated occupation, whether workers would be paid the same. We think not, and that is what we expect the finding of the court to be.”

“The work that those in the aged care sector perform is complex, skilled and crucial to society. How can minimum rates of pay for these women be justified?” McLeod said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: