Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Market transparency key to the Christchurch rebuild

Market transparency key to the Christchurch rebuild

27 June 2013

"The agreement between Government and the Christchurch City Council on cost sharing arrangements for infrastructure and the anchor projects in the Christchurch Central Recovery Plan is an important milestone but now needs to be backed by a comprehensive plan and transparent process about how the projects will be procured and delivered," says Stephen Selwood Chief Executive of the New Zealand Council for Infrastructure Development.

"There is significant private sector interest in the Canterbury rebuild from design and construction to finance and operation. This includes investors and companies from across New Zealand and internationally with a sound track record of delivery and necessary access to finance, technology and commercial expertise.

"But confidence to invest and commit resources is dependent on the scale of the investment opportunity; the commitment of the Council and the Crown to partner with the private sector; the clarity of project timing; and when and how procurement decisions will be made.

"Openness and transparency of the process is particularly important if we want to attract investment from outside of Canterbury.

"The Government has stated that new timelines and designs for projects will be announced progressively over the coming months, giving impetus to private sector developers as the public sector’s vision of the CBD becomes clearer.

"The industry's preference is that a Canterbury project pipeline is developed which clearly sets out, for all parties to see, when and how projects will be brought to market.

"This should include the timeline for each project as it moves from indicative to detailed business case, to market sounding, expressions of interest, to request for proposal, bid evaluation and the award of the contract.

"Once this is put in place it will be critical that both the Crown and the Council adhere to the timelines and ensure that the very best expertise is employed by each party to effectively manage procurement and delivery of projects.

"The more certainty that can be provided to the construction and finance sectors the stronger will be the competition and the greater the capacity of the industry to deliver," Selwood says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news