Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Holcim Invests in Cement Import Terminal

Holcim Invests in Cement Import Terminal

1 August 2013 – Holcim (New Zealand) Ltd will spend more than NZD 100M over the next three years constructing an import terminal and related infrastructure that will allow it to import and distribute bulk cement for supply to the New Zealand market. The terminal, which is expected to be operational in 2 – 3 years time, will be based on similar Holcim operations throughout the world.

Announcing the decision, Holcim (New Zealand) Ltd Managing Director Jeremy Smith said: “This represents a substantial commitment by Holcim to the New Zealand building materials market. It means we will be able to leverage off the vast resources available through the Holcim Ltd worldwide supply network to ensure that our New Zealand customers receive cement of a quality and specification suitable for New Zealand conditions.”

The location of Holcim New Zealand’s new import terminal is yet to be finalised and the company is investigating options at a number of New Zealand ports.

Once operational, cement imported through the new terminal will replace local production at the company’s Westport cement plant. Holcim New Zealand has signaled for some years that the Westport plant was not sustainable long term. The decision also means that the proposal for a new cement plant at Weston, near Oamaru, is on hold for the foreseeable future but Holcim will continue to maintain ownership of their land assets.

“We recognise that this decision has an impact for our staff, customers and for the Westport and Weston communities. It’s one we’ve arrived at after extensively investigating a range of cement supply options and we will be working through the implications with those who will be impacted by the move,” Jeremy Smith said. “For the current economic environment, constructing an import terminal and importing cement is simply the most appropriate decision.”

Holcim (New Zealand) Ltd is a leading New Zealand supplier of cement, aggregates and lime. Its involvement in the New Zealand building industry dates back to 1888, and today it operates more than 30 sites and employs approximately 420 people. It is part of the Holcim Group, one of the world’s leading suppliers of cement, aggregates and construction-related services represented in around 70 countries on all continents.

www.holcim.com/nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news