Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Live Seafood Trade to Australia Realistic Prospect

Media Statement – For immediate release

13 October 2013

Live Seafood Trade to Australia Realistic Prospect

The New Zealand seafood industry is looking to realise $100 million worth of live seafood exports a year to Australia.

The announcement at the beginning of the month by the Minister of Primary Industries, Nathan Guy, that his ministry has scheduled work on how to get a live trade with Australia functioning, and the development of Precision Seafood Harvesting, which brings fish on board alive, have given an impetus to the prospects of live seafood exports to Australia.

The Chair of Seafood New Zealand, Eric Barratt, says exclusive restaurants and retailers in Australia are likely to pay a premium for many seafood species if they are delivered alive rather than frozen.

He says there is much technical and negotiation work still ahead to have trade arrangements secured.

“Biosecurity is important for both countries, and Australian scientists and officials will want to assure themselves that there is minimal risk of a new species of fish, or any associated organisms, from New Zealand, establishing themselves in Australia as a result of exports,” Eric Barratt says.

New Zealand already exports live seafood to many parts of the world, with rock lobsters consignments to Hong Kong/China being the largest single earner. Other seafoods exported live from New Zealand include paua, mussels, clams, oysters and eels.

“For years we haven’t seriously worked on a trans-Tasman live trade,” Eric Barratt says. “We did have green mussels going there in the early days of mussel farming and even some oysters up to the 1990s. But Australia took a precautionary attitude and exports stopped. We feel that technically there are now the tools and trade regime to open up exports again.”

Eric Barratt says the most likely initial exports are bivalves, in particular surf clams. Total Allowable Commercial Catches for surf clams, such as tuatua, were substantially increased earlier this year.

“This sort of seafood can be packed in small consumer packs, which present less of a biosecurity risk, and they can be kept alive quite happily for a long time in those packs,” he says.

“The other prospect is with live fin fish which will be caught in our new Precision Seafood Harvesting system. The fish are landed on board our vessels live. That’s a very exciting prospect for an export industry.”

“There’s a lot of water to flow before we are underway. Apart from the trade protocols, we have a lot of technical work to do before we can transport any volumes of live fin fish, and then we need to market the exports as well. All of this takes time.”

The Chair of the Sydney Fish Market, Graham Turk, is likewise enthusiastic about the prospects of New Zealand live imports into Australia, once any biosecurity issues have been resolved.

“It’s an exciting opportunity. There’s a large and growing market for live seafood of all kinds here,” he says. “Live is the ultimate in freshness and we’d be happy to handle that product as we already do with present seafood exports to Australia from New Zealand.”

Graham Turk predicts a high demand for live seafood from Australia’s Asian communities. “There are also many Asian visitors to Australia, and I’d see restaurants catering to this market with your live seafood to select from.”

Note

Rock Lobster exports to China are by far the biggest value live export – $237,224,978 FOB in the 2013/2013 year

The biggest markets by species are;

Paua to China - $276,946

Mussels to US - $201,370

Eels to Republic of Korea - $1,512,764

Scallops to Tahiti – $20,652

Pacific oysters to New Caledonia - $1,023,051

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Media: Julian Wilcox Leaves Māori TV

Māori Television has confirmed the resignation of Head of News and Production Julian Wilcox. Mr Maxwell acknowledged Mr Wilcox’s significant contribution to Māori Television since joining the organisation in 2004. More>>

ALSO:

Genetics: New Heat Tolerant Cow Developed

Hamilton, New Zealand-based Dairy Solutionz Ltd has led an expert genetics team to develop a new dairy cow breed conditioned to thrive in lower elevation tropical climates and achieve high milk production under heat stress. More>>

Fractals: Thousands More Business Cards Needed To Build Giant Sponge

New Zealand is taking part in a global event this weekend to build a Menger Sponge using 15 million business cards but local organisers say they are thousands of business cards short. More>>

Scoop Business: NZ Net Migration Rises To Annual Record In September

New Zealand’s annual net migration rose to a record in September, beating government forecasts, as the inflow was spurred by student arrivals from India and Kiwis returning home from Australia. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Fletcher To Close Its Christchurch Insulation Plant, Cut 29 Jobs

Fletcher Building, New Zealand’s largest listed company, will close its Christchurch insulation factory, as it consolidates its Tasman Insulations operations in a “highly competitive market”. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Novartis Adds Nine New Treatments Under Pharmac Deal

Novartis New Zealand, the local unit of the global pharmaceuticals firm, has added nine new treatments in a far-ranging agreement with government drug buying agency, Pharmac. More>>

ALSO:

Crown Accounts: English Wary On Tax Take, Could Threaten Surplus

Finance Minister Bill English is warning the tax take may come in below forecast in the current financial year, as figures released today confirm it was short by nearly $1 billion in the year to June 30 and English warned of the potential impact of slumping receipts from agricultural exports. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand

Mosh Social Media
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news