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Auckland fastest-growing region, SI districts grow most

Auckland fastest-growing region since last census, and South Island districts grow most – Media release

15 October 2013

Auckland’s population grew by over 110,000 people since the 2006 Census, while Selwyn, Queenstown-Lakes, and Waimakariri were the fastest-growing districts in the country, Statistics New Zealand said today.

The 2013 Census figures, released today, show the Auckland region had a census usually resident population count of 1.42 million, up about 8 percent since 2006. Just over half of New Zealand’s population growth since the last census occurred in Auckland.

“All 21 local board areas in Auckland increased in population between 2006 and 2013. Waitemata, Upper Harbour, Rodney, Howick, and Franklin grew particularly fast,” Government Statistician Liz MacPherson said.

“The census counts show that population change has not been uniform across New Zealand. This largely reflects the movement of people within New Zealand as well as the influence of international migration.”

New Zealand gained 7,000 people a year from migration between 2006 and 2013 – less than a third of the 23,000 gained per year between 2001 and 2006.

“After Auckland, Nelson was the next-fastest-growing region, followed by Waikato. Southland turned around a declining population, growing by over 2,000 people in the seven years since the last census,” Ms MacPherson said.

Growth in districts and cities

Overall, 47 of the 67 territorial authority (council) areas grew in population over the past seven years. The three fastest rates of population growth in district or city council areas were:
• Selwyn district, up nearly a third to 44,595 people
• Queenstown-Lakes district, up 23 percent to 28,224 people
• Waimakariri district, up 17 percent to 49,989 people.

These three areas were also the fastest-growing between 2001 and 2006.

“Around Canterbury we’ve seen that although Christchurch city’s population is lower than at the 2006 Census, the overall region has grown. That’s partly because some people from Christchurch have moved to surrounding districts like Waimakariri and Selwyn, and even further afield to Ashburton and Hurunui. So they’ve left the city but not the region,” Ms MacPherson said.

The fastest-growing district in the North Island was Carterton, which increased 16 percent to over 8,000 people. Populations declined nearly 13 percent in Ruapehu district, just over 8 percent in Kawerau district, and 7 percent in Wairoa district.

Census counts differ from population estimates

The census counts for regions and territorial authority areas are typically lower than the latest population estimates, which are produced annually. This is because the estimates include New Zealand residents temporarily overseas at the time of the census, and an adjustment for people missed by the census.

More population information coming in December 2013

“We are releasing today’s information two months ahead of schedule. We know that many organisations and people rely on population information from the census to make good decisions about services and infrastructure. More detailed information will be available in December, including data on ethnicity, sex, age, and dwellings,” Ms MacPherson said. New Zealand’s census usually resident population count was 4,242,048 in 2013, up from 4,027,947 in 2006.


For more information about these statistics:
• Visit 2013 Census Usually Resident Population Counts
• Open the attached files

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