Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Airport expects no credit rating impact from capital return

Auckland Airport expects no credit rating impact from raising debt to return capital

Nov. 28 (BusinessDesk) – Auckland International Airport, the second largest company on the NZX 50 Index by market value, expects to maintain its credit rating while taking on debt to part fund a $454 million capital return to shareholders, says chief financial officer Simon Robertson.

The nation’s busiest gateway plans to shrink its shares on issue to 1.19 billion from 1.32 billion via a one-in 10 share cancellation at $3.43 a share. At that price, the company’s ratio of debt to enterprise value would rise to 28.1 percent from 20.1 percent, it said. The shares rose 1.3 percent to $3.46 on the NZX today and have climbed 28 percent this year.

Auckland Airport’s A-minus rating with Standard & Poor’s is the highest for any airport in Australasia, alongside Melbourne Airport. The rating has been on positive outlook since September last year and Robertson said he expects that to be reviewed back to neutral, given the transaction.

“We have significant headroom for what is appropriate for a rating of A-minus,” he told BusinessDesk.

The airport had looked hard at its future capital spending requirements, including up to $130 million in the 2014 financial year, and was satisfied the capital return wouldn’t harm its growth aspirations, he said.

The company had $69 million of cash and cash equivalents on its balance sheet as at June 30, though since then has paid out a final dividend. Cash will have built up again by April next year, when the capital return is planned, though funding will be predominantly from new debt, Robertson said.

The return is effectively tax free, subject to a shareholder’s personal circumstances, because the Inland Revenue Department is satisfied that an amount equal to its available subscribed capital, or $181.6 million, isn’t in lieu of a dividend, and the remaining $272.4 million will be deemed a dividend for tax purposes and fully imputed at the 28 percent company tax rate.

Because of the capital return, the airport won’t pay an interim dividend for the 2014 year. To fund the bulk of the return, the airport will put in place new short-term bank facilities, which will later be replaced by long-term funding.

Robertson said the final refinancing would be targeting an average maturity of more than seven years, pushing out the overall weighted average maturity profile of the company’s debt, which stood at 4.21 years as at June 30. Net cash flow from operating activities was $207.8 million last year.

The transaction requires approval of at least 75 percent of voting shareholders and the company would then seek final High Court clearance in March, with the return of capital aimed for mid-April, it said in a statement.

(BusinessDesk)


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news