Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


PowerbyProxi to license technology to Texas Instruments

PowerbyProxi agrees to license technology to Texas Instruments for development of new products

Jan. 7 (BusinessDesk) – PowerbyProxi, the wireless power developer spun out of Auckland University, has agreed to license its technology to Texas Instruments, allowing the world’s largest analogue chipmaker to add new wireless power and charging products.

“Texas Instruments is recognised as the leading supplier of wired and wireless power solutions and respected across consumer electronics devices, industrial systems and battery management,” PowerbyProxi chief executive and chairman Greg Cross said in a statement. “The market has been waiting for resonant wireless power technologies for rapid growth and expansion.”

Dallas-based Texas Instruments makes chips that are used in almost every digital device, from parts for space hardware to home electronics components. The company is shifting its focus to analogue and embedded-processing markets and moving away from modems in mobile phones.

“Consumers have a deep desire to charge portable electronics anywhere and anytime and designers of end equipment want wireless power interoperability,” Steve Lambouses, Texas Instruments vice president and general manager of battery management said in the statement.

“PowerbyProxi’s wireless power technologies can work across any standard being used and developed globally,” Lombouses said. “We believe this is an excellent opportunity to use their expertise and intellectual property to provide new and exciting capabilities to the market.”

Auckland-based PowerbyProxi has a portfolio of 126 worldwide patents. The company didn’t disclose the value of the licensing agreement.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Food: Govt Obesity Plan - No Tax Or Legislation

Speaking to Q+A’s Corin Dann this morning, health minister Jonathan Coleman said tackling obesity was at the top of the Government’s priority list, but there was “no evidence” a sugar tax worked, and further regulation was unnecessary. More>>

ALSO:

Treasury Docs On LVR Policy: Government Inaction Leads To Blurring Of Roles

The Treasury wouldn’t have had to warn the Reserve Bank to stick to its core functions if the Government had taken prompt and substantial measures to rein in skyrocketing Auckland house prices, Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Final EPA Decision: Tough Bar Set For Ruataniwha Dam

Today’s final decision by the Tukituki Catchment Board of Inquiry is good news for the river and the environment, says Labour’s Water spokesperson Meka Whaitiri. “Setting a strict level of dissolved nitrogen in the catchment’s waters will ensure that the dam has far less of an impact on the Tukituki river." More>>

ALSO:

"Don’t Give Up":
End Of Kick-Start Hits KiwiSaver Enrolments

ANZ said new enrolments for the ANZ KiwiSaver Scheme had dropped by more than 50% since the Government announced an immediate end to the $1,000 KiwiSaver kick-start incentive in the Budget last month. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news