Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Over $2,000 more in our back pockets

Over $2,000 more in our back pockets

Salaries grew by over $2,000 in 2013, shows data released today by SEEK, New Zealand’s largest job source. The average Kiwi pay packet increased by 3% to $74,002 per annum across jobs advertised on

“A 3% increase in average salaries for jobs listed on equates to an additional $185 every month. This makes a significant difference to New Zealander’s spending ability, as highlighted by the recent increase in spending, with record retail sales over the holidays,” comments Janet Faulding, General Manager - SEEK New Zealand.

Interestingly, it wasn’t the big cities to lead the way in salary growth over the last 12 months. Gisborne’s average pay packet rose a significant 10% to $75,000 and Marlborough grew by 8% to over $65,000 - driven by a particularly strong demand for quality employees in the wine industry. Northland and Manawatu salaries both grew by 6% to $66,160 and $62,803 respectively.

Main cities also fared well, with Wellington claiming the highest average national income of over $81,000 and with pay increasing by 4%. Salaries in Auckland increased by 3% to over $75,000 and Canterbury by 5% to almost $73,000.

The industries paying the highest salaries in 2013 on were dominated by Construction, Consulting & Management and Information & Communication Technology - all offering average salaries above $90,000.

The fastest growing salaries were in Design & Architecture, which increased by almost 12% and Construction which increased by 10.2%. The property market in 2013 experienced a surge of activity in both the commercial and residential sectors, driving demand and in-turn forcing salaries skyward.

“The buoyant real estate market and Christchurch reconstruction are key factors driving the need for employees in Design & Architecture and Construction with this trajectory expected to continue in 2014,” says Ms Faulding.

“With many economists predicting that the New Zealand economy will grow at its fastest pace since 2007 this year, we expect 2014 to be a strong year for the job market and salary growth,” says Ms Faulding.

“Some job hunters may be willing to switch employers without a pay rise, providing other perks such as flexible hours or health insurance are offered. Some however, will want an increase of cold hard cash in their pay packet at the end of the month -with the opportunity to earn a higher salary regularly topping the list of factors most likely to make people jump ship,” Ms Faulding concludes.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news