Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


No such thing as too many chiefs at dairy women’s conference

No such thing as too many chiefs at dairy women’s conference

David Galbraith works with the Chiefs rugby team and Barbara Chapman is the chief executive of ASB. In March they will put a rural focus on their work and discuss how New Zealand’s dairy farming women can achieve world-class mental and financial performance at the Dairy Women’s Network’s annual conference in Hamilton.

Galbraith is one of the men behind some of our country’s finest sporting moments. A clinical psychologist specialising in elite sport, he grew up on a beef and sheep farm in the Hawke’s Bay where his parents still live today.

He’s worked with the likes of BMX Olympic medal winner Sarah Walker, and the Chiefs super rugby and Magic netball teams. While others massage and coach, he’s focused on the mind, ensuring there’s nothing between the ears that is going to hinder a great performance.

He said he has seen great leaders turn average teams into world class teams – and that the same principles, as he sees them, can be applied to the farming context.

“There are some key components for developing mental grit which help you deal with the hard times and continue your personal growth - regardless of what the weather is doing. People who master these principles can also help others get through tough times,” said Galbraith.

Some of the components he’ll discuss at the conference include self-acceptance, mental focus, redefining success and the power of optimism. He’ll also talk about the impact of mental distress, such as chronic stress, depression and anxiety.

He said women are a critical part of the dairying business and brought an element that can take a team from functioning to flourishing.

The ASB’s chief executive Barbara Chapman kicks off day two of the conference talking about the importance and challenges involved with always being one step ahead of the game, and the need to be constantly innovative in your business approach.

Chapman has more than 30 years’ experience in the banking sector and was New Zealand's inaugural "Marketer of the Year". She has received numerous awards for innovative and effective marketing throughout her career and has held the top role at ASB since 2011.

She said there are many business synergies between banking and farming when it comes to being innovative.

“Bankers and farmers both operate in dynamic industries driven by changing customer demands and rapid advancements in technology. We all need to be prepared to take some educated bets on what is going to form the next wave of innovation.

“I’m convinced that New Zealand’s financial services and farming sectors can both lead the way globally in many of the things we do. Certainly in New Zealand, being smaller, more nimble and more willing to experiment than most of our major global counterparts has its advantages and we can capitalise on this,” said Chapman.

RD1 Ltd also announced it is the new national sponsor of the Dairy Women’s Network conference. RD1 spokesperson Justine Pearce said RD1 also sponsors the Network’s regional groups, which support regional development opportunities for dairying women across the country. She said this investment in the larger national picture is a natural progression.

“The Network’s conference is a great opportunity for women from around the country to hear presentations and attend workshops led by national and international dairy experts. They also talk with each other and use what they have learned to increase the success of their own dairying businesses.”

The third ‘Dairy Woman of the Year’ award winner will also be announced at the conference gala dinner, which will be hosted by journalist and head of Maori TV, Carol Hirschfeld. The winner will be awarded a position on the prestigious Women in Leadership 12 month programme run by Global Women, which is valued at $25,000.The award is sponsored by Fonterra Milk Supply.

Early bird registrations for the conference are now open. Women working in the business of dairying can register at or phone 0800 396 748.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news