Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Liam Butler talks to CEO of NZ Food and Grocery Council

Liam Butler talks to Katherine Rich - CEO of New Zealand Food and Grocery Council

27 January 2014

Katherine Rich is the CEO of the New Zealand Food and Grocery Council, the industry body representing food and grocery manufacturers and marketers.

Deborah Cohen is a senior natural scientist at US think tank Rand Corp. and the author of the forthcoming book A Big Fat Crisis. She states that...

"if Americans did not live in a world filled with buffets, cheap fast food, soft drinks with corn syrup, and too many foods with excess fat, salt and sugar, the incidence of obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes probably would plummet. Education can help, but what's really needed is regulation - for example, limits on marketing that caters to our addiction to sugar and fat."

Katherine can you please share how you think a tax could possibly put the elderly at risk and what the FGC can do to improve the wellbeing of older people who are overweight?

Some public health nutrition experts advise that price increases, such as those caused by a tax on sugar, are a barrier to people on low incomes eating healthily, and could lead to a long-term increase in obesity and other health problems. That's because such a tax would put up the price of a huge number of foods, including many staple foods, forcing those who could least afford it, including elderly people on fixed incomes, to switch to cheaper, less nutritious options. It could well mean they would be swapping one ingredient for a worse one.A tax on sugar would not improve health, it would just penalise moderate consumption. It's important to keep this in perspective. We all need some sugar (and salt and fat) in our diets to keep us healthy, as long as we consume it in moderation. That is the key. Even if sugar were to be removed from popular products, consumers would immediately switch to other brands with their desired taste profile and nothing would have been achieved.

FGC believes education is the key to better health, and our members are involved in programmes which promote both healthier food choices and the importance of exercise. FGC takes every opportunity to promote moderation in our diets.

The Ministry of Health, the Nutrition Foundation, the Heart Foundation, and Age Concern all have excellent resources and advice on nutrition and recommendations for keeping active for older people. The Ministry of Health has also published a paper, updated last year, entitled Health and Nutrition Guidelines for Older People. Some websites that Eldernet Gazette readers might find useful and interesting are:
http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/food-and-nutrition-guidelines-healthy-older-people-background-paper
http://www.heartfoundation.org.nz/blog-stories/blog/nutrition-for-older-people
http://www.nutritionfoundation.org.nz/about-nznf/NZNF-Committee-for-Healthy-Ageing/Nutrition-for-older-adults
http://www.ageconcern.org.nz/

Deborah Cohen cites research from the U.S. that "44 per cent of male doctors in the US are overweight. A study by the University of Maryland School of Nursing found that 55 per cent of nurses surveyed were overweight or obese". What can FGC do to improve the wellbeing of such health professionals in N.Z?

I wasn't aware of this figure. It's an interesting fact. This question would be better directed to an organisation such as the Royal College of General Practitioners, one of whose roles is promoting self-care among the profession. Their website is www.rnzcgp.org.nz. FGC believes education is the key to healthier eating for everyone.

Making sure all consumers have adequate information about the food they are buying can make a huge difference, and we have been contributing to the New Zealand/Australian development of an improved labelling regime on food to encourage consumers to make better choices. But labelling is not a magic solution to the obesity problem.

The recent decision by the Government to broaden the way nutrition content and health claims are made on food products is a great step forward in that it will give consumers more information that is evidence-based.

Link to Deborah Cohen's article: http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/9563814/Top-five-obesity-myths

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Half Empty: Fonterra's 2017 Opening Forecast Below Expectations

Fonterra Cooperative Group raised its forecast farmgate milk payout for next season by less than expected as the world's largest dairy exporter predicts lower prices will crimp production and supply will pick up. The New Zealand dollar fell. More>>

ALSO:

Pest Control: Mouse Blitz Team Leaves For Antipodes

The Million Dollar Mouse project to rid Antipodes Island of mice is underway with the departure of a rodent eradication team to the remote nature reserve and World Heritage Area. More>>

Gongs Got: Canon Media Awards & NZ Radio Awards Happen

Radio NZ: RNZ website The Wireless, which is co-funded by NZ On Air, was named best website, while Toby Manhire and Toby Morris won the best opinion general writing section for their weekly column on rnz.co.nz and Tess McClure won the best junior feature writer section. More>>

ALSO:

Pre-Budget: Debt Focus Risks Losing Opportunity To Stoke Economy

The Treasury is likely to upgrade its forecasts for economic growth in Budget 2016 next week but Finance Minister Bill English has already signalled that more of his focus is on debt repayment than on fiscal stimulus or tax cuts... More>>

ALSO:

Fulton Hogan's Heroes: Managing Director Nick Miller Resigns

Fulton Hogan managing director Nick Miller will leave the privately owned construction company after seven years in charge. The Dunedin-based company has kicked off a search for a replacement, and Miller will stay on at the helm until March next year, or until a successor has been appointed and a transition period completed. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Electricity, Executions, And Bob Dylan

The Electricity Authority has unveiled the final version of its pricing plan for electricity transmission. This will change the way transmission prices (which comprise about 10% of the average power bill) are computed, and will add hundreds of dollars a year to power bills for many ordinary consumers. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Fonterra NZ, Australia Milk Collection Drops In Season

Fonterra Cooperative Group says milk collection is down in New Zealand and Australia, its two largest markets, in the first 11 months of the season during a period of weak dairy prices. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news