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Wiggs steps down as independent director of Cadimage Group

29th January 2014

After almost four years, Lance Wiggs is stepping down as the independent director of Cadimage Group.

During the last four years Cadimage Group expanded from one to five offices, moved from ten to twenty six staff and doubled revenue.

“It’s been fantastic having Lance on the board of Cadimage. We increased our internal capabilities, took a much more comprehensive and longer strategic perspective and successfully acquired three great companies, two of them offshore,” says Campbell Yule, Managing Director of Cadimage Group.

Lance joined the Cadimage board as New Zealand emerged from the GFC.

"Campbell, Tracey and the team should be extraordinarily proud of what they have achieved, moving in the last four years from very lean times and tough decisions to the second successive record calendar year in 2013 and strong teams in Australia and the UK. The focus for the next few years is to grow and increasingly professionalise the global sales capability, and it's time for another independent director to take over the mantle,” says Lance Wiggs.

Cadimage's local business success is an encouraging sign for New Zealand's economy, with record sales of ArchiCAD – New Zealand's most popular architectural BIM software – an indicator of the amount of upcoming building activity in Christchurch and Auckland. Cadimage has also expanded its product range to include Solibri, a BIM model checker and a range of Siemens PLM products including Solid Edge, a mechanical design system and Femap, which is an advanced finite element analysis tool for engineers.

"We are now being recognised by international suppliers for our customer service and professional approach," says Campbell, “and we have expanded our sales and technical support teams in New Zealand, Australia and the UK to meet demand. We see that the next two years will be important to deliver operational excellence for our customers and suppliers."

An announcement on a replacement director is yet to be made.


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