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New Alison’s Pantry Raw Power: A Spoonful of Health

29 January 2014

New Alison’s Pantry Raw Power: A Spoonful of Health

Alison’s Pantry has launched a delicious and nutritious new superfood mix of fruit, nuts and seeds that is raw, natural, and tastes great while being so good for you.

Raw Power mix is a nutrient dense blend of goji berries, raisins, sultanas, coconut chips, Brazil nuts, almonds, hazelnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, hulled buckwheat along with diced dates and apricot pieces.

It is naturally sweetened with real fruit and designed to be eaten for breakfast. It is delicious paired with Greek yoghurt, or Almond milk if you are Paelo inclined, blended into a smoothie or for a nutrient loaded breakfast on the run, or eaten just as it is!

Naturally gluten-free, and packed with antioxidants, Alison’s Pantry Raw Power is high in dietary fibre, omega 3, calcium, protein and essential minerals. With intense flavours of apricot and coconut, creamy dates and the crunch and flavour of seeds and blended nuts, it is deliciously filling.

“Everything in Raw Power has been included for its nutritional benefits or its fantastic taste,” saysProlife Foods General Manager Self Selection, Ian Jackson.

“The dried fruit, raw nuts, and seeds in this blend have a broad range of health advantages including lowering cholesterol, supporting brain function and providing essential minerals and vitamins to help keep Kiwis feeling well on the inside and looking good on the outside. It’s the perfect kick-start to the New Year.”

Raw Power is available now at self-selection departments in New World and Pak’N Save supermarkets.

Alison’s Pantry is committed to providing a broad range of healthy, nutritious and convenient options for New Zealanders. For further information on Raw Power, and for great recipe ideas featuring other Alison’s Pantry products, visit www.alisonspantry.co.nz.

About Prolife Foods
Prolife Foods began in 1984 as a hot nut vending supplier to health shops and the hospitality trade. It is a proudly Kiwi owned business that is now one of New Zealand’s largest importers, manufacturer and marketer of nuts, dried fruits, snack foods, cereals and confectionery products.

Staple household brands include Alison’s Pantry, Mother Earth, Value Pack and Donovans Chocolates.

ENDS

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