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New tug for Ports of Auckland

30 January 2014

New tug for Ports of Auckland

New investment for bigger ships, more containers

Ports of Auckland today announced it is buying a new tug - and two new straddle carriers - as it prepares to meet continuing growth at its container terminal.

The new tug, and the two new straddle carriers, are already under construction and will be delivered later this year.

This investment, worth around $12 million, will allow the port to handle bigger ships and boost container handling speed and efficiency.

Ports of Auckland CEO Tony Gibson said “Container volumes are up, Auckland is growing fast, and this investment is all about handling that growth efficiently. This new equipment will help us get the most out of our compact central city site.”

Ports of Auckland Senior Manager Marine Services, Allan D’Souza said “I am excited to be able to buy this powerful new tug. Bigger ships are on the way, so we need more power and manoeuvrability on the water. Our new tug is perfect for the job.”

Tug
• The ASD 2411 tug is being built by Dutch shipbuilder Damen at their facility in Changde, China.
• It has 68 tonnes bollard-pull, and will be the strongest tug at Ports of Auckland. The port’s current strongest tugs, Waipapa and Waka Kume have 51 tonnes bollard-pull.
• Length (LOA): 24.47m; Beam: 11.33m; Draft: 5.35m; Engines: Two caterpillar 3516C TA HD/D engines with a total output of 4180 kW at 1600 rpm; Two Rolls Royce US255 thrusters deliver the tug’s power and manoeuvrability.

The new tug under construction and an artist’s impression of the new tug.

Straddle carriers
• Two Noell Eco-drive SC634E straddle carriers, equipped with the latest safety and driver-assist technology, similar to modern cars.
• 180 degree rotating driving position, to improve comfort and reduce driver fatigue.
• They re-use energy generated from braking and lowering containers and have lower fuel consumption, lower emissions and make less noise.
• The straddles can be made taller, to stack containers four high. The current maximum is three high.

Ports of Auckland Ltd is the port for New Zealand’s largest city, Auckland. It handles over 818,000 TEU (20ft-equivalent units), more than 1,400 ship calls and 4.4 m tonnes of break-bulk (non-containerised) cargo per annum. It is New Zealand’s import hub, New Zealand’s premier cruise port and the country’s main vehicle import gateway. A key partner to export and import industries, Ports of Auckland is 100%

ENDS

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