Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


ShelterBox CEO Alison Wallace visits Philippines

Media Release

30th January 2014

ShelterBox CEO Alison Wallace visits Philippines.

Click for big version.

Alison Wallace at 'The Day the Bombs Fell' book launch, London, November 2013.

New Zealander Alison Wallace and Chief Executive of ShelterBox, is travelling to the Philippines to see for herself how ShelterBox aid is helping communities devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.
In less than three months ShelterBox teams have worked tirelessly to bring shelter and vital aid to nearly 4,500 Filipino families who lost their homes to the devastating Typhoon Haiyan on 8 November. 

This is part of the international disaster relief charity’s commitment to provide 1,685 ShelterBoxes, 4,607 tents and 1,516 midi tents, which in total will help over 7,800 families. The remainder of this aid will arrive in fortnightly consignments over the coming months. 

ShelterBox distributions are continuing on many islands, including Bohol, Leyte, Bantayan and Panay, and now Mindanao.

Chief Executive Alison Wallace flew in with colleagues yesterday. Her aim is to check progress, talk to partner organisations, and meet beneficiary families.

Collaboration key to efficiency’

‘In terms of the number of Response Teams required, and the complexity of getting to remote island communities, this has been ShelterBox’s most testing disaster response ever,’ said Alison. ‘Collaboration is key to efficiency, and we have had valuable support from partner aid agencies such as Plan International and Handicap International, and from the British, Australian and Philippines Navies.’

Aid distributed includes ShelterBox’s specially-designed family tents, mosquito nets and water filtration kits to protect against disease, and solar powered lighting for personal security. Tool kits also allow the long process of rebuilding to begin.

‘I visited the Philippines last year before Haiyan struck, when ShelterBox was responding to another typhoon,’ added Alison. ‘Our people are well-practised at providing aid in this part of the world, so we have been able to deploy extremely well-experienced individuals. While I am here I will see the full range of our work, from the urban devastation of Tacloban to remote islands such as Bantayan and Panay.’

I’m sure it will be an eye-opener’

‘It will be a privilege to report back to our donors, whose generosity has made this disaster relief possible. I am sure it will be an eye-opener, both in terms of scale and the international aid response. I’m looking forward to meeting some of the recipient families, and our hardworking response teams who will continue to help them until the job is done.’

Follow Alison in the Philippines through her twitter account and get the latest updates through the ShelterBox New Zealand account.

About Shelterbox 

Since 2000, ShelterBox has provided shelter, warmth and dignity following more than 200 disasters in over 90 countries worldwide. The charity has provided shelter for more than 130,000 families in desperate need. Supported by Rotary International, ShelterBox instantly responds to earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, cyclones, tsunami or conflict by delivering boxes of aid and other vital supplies.
Each iconic green ShelterBox contains a disaster relief tent for an extended family, stove, blankets and water filtration system, among other tools for survival. ShelterBox New Zealand is administered by the Rotary Club of Mosgiel Charitable Trust based in Mosgiel, New Zealand and its goal is to help 50,000 each year.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Trade: NZ Trade Deficit Widens To A Record In September

Oct. 27 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's monthly trade deficit widened to a record in September as meat exports dropped to their lowest level in more than three years. More>>


Animal Welfare: Cruel Practices Condemned By DairyNZ Chief

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says cruel and illegal practices are not in any way condoned or accepted by the industry as part of dairy farming.

Tim says the video released today by Farmwatch shows some footage of transport companies and their workers, as well as some unacceptable behaviour by farmers of dragging calves. More>>


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


International Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news