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Future of land boundaries

Future of land boundaries

Surveyor-General Dr Don Grant was today pleased to launchCadastre 2034 – a comprehensive strategy designed to ensure that, in the future, New Zealanders will be able to more easily understand where their rights in land actually are.

The cadastre is the record of boundaries and locations of rights in land. New Zealand’s world-class cadastre already gives New Zealanders certainty about their properties when buying, selling and using land.

“While good advice can be obtained from the land professionals who understand the cadastre, it is not easily understood or accessible to the general public – or even to many government agencies,” Dr Grant says.

“People today are increasingly getting information delivered through their smartphones, and are able to see where they are on a map to within a few metres. This strategy is based on the idea that people will expect clear and reliable information about land to be delivered to them wherever they are.

“This information will need to include the complete set of land and property rights, restrictions and responsibilities that apply to the use of land. To make use of this information, people need to know where these rights apply.”

The cadastre provides government and private individuals with a robust foundation on which to grow the country’s economy – safeguarding nearly $700 billion in residential property wealth alone.

“The strategy also sets the cadastral system within the wider location system – the growing of which will prompt the development of innovative tools and information services.

“Through Cadastre 2034, cadastral data will be able to be reused and integrated with other spatially-related information – generating good decisions about the best use and management of land.

“The strategy will enable people to have continued confidence in the extent of the rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to their land and property.”


ends

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