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New Zealand Olympians Get Smart with Samsung Technology

New Zealand Olympians Get Smart with Samsung Technology

‘Smart Beanie Project’ and Samsung Galaxy Note 3 smartphones capture athletes’ journey so Kiwis can experience Olympic moments first-hand

AUCKLAND – February 3, 2014 – Samsung Electronics New Zealand today announced the technological support of New Zealand Olympic Winter athletes Jossi Wells and Anna Willcox. Samsung will provide the pair with Smart Beanies and Galaxy Note 3 smartphones to share their Olympic experiences with Kiwis across the globe.

The Samsung Smart Beanies Project will allow New Zealanders to see exactly what skiers Jossi and Anna see as they progress through the games. Samsung has provided its support to help further Jossi and Anna’s Olympic dreams and to provide all New Zealanders with a first-hand experience of what it is like to compete as an Olympic athlete.

The beanies will work with the athletes’ Galaxy Note 3 smartphones, which have been named the official Olympic Games phone for Sochi 2014.


As part of our Global Sponsorship partnership with the IOC, Samsung New Zealand is working closely with the New Zealand Olympic Committee and our athletes to get exclusive behind the scenes content.

Each device automatically tracks its athlete’s location, speed, heart rate, and even which way up they are. The beanie and Galaxy Note 3 will also capture exciting moments with an onboard camera.

Back home, people can see online what our inspiring free skiers see. So while our athletes are giving it their all, the Samsung Smart Beanies Project will make sure every New Zealander can be right there with them.

“Showing people what we’ve been training for, what we have to push our bodies to do, and all the complexities of our sport from our point of view is priceless,” said Jossi Wells, New Zealand slopestyle and halfpipe skier. “The best way to understand the challenges we face and how we’re putting it on the line for New Zealand is to see what we see. Samsung has enabled that.”

Content generated from the project will be available via the official social media streams of Samsung New Zealand and the New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC), and the Samsung SportsFlow app. This will include training footage, as well as exclusive behind the scenes sneak peeks captured in the Olympic Village by our athletes.

“I’ve wanted to share my experiences with my family and friends since I began skiing,” said Anna Willcox, New Zealand slopestyle skier. “The beanies are such a clever way to record what’s happening while I concentrate on what’s important, skiing. They allow me to share my journey with the people I care about and with the people who have supported me over the years.”

“We know just how committed Kiwi sports fans are and we are proud to play a part in bringing the athletes and their supporters together. Jossi and Anna will be two of more than 2,500 athletes with Samsung smartphones at the Olympic Games. We wish them both well and can’t wait to share in their Olympic success,” said Mike Cornwell, Marketing Director, Samsung New Zealand.

New Zealanders are encouraged to follow Jossi and Anna though their training, arrival at the Olympic village, opening ceremonies, and their first course look and practice runs in Sochi.

You can follow the action on social media:
• NZOC on Facebook and Twitter
• Samsung on Facebook and at www.samsung.com/nz/winter2014

ends

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