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Golden opportunity to hook into multicore's promise

"New Zealand has golden opportunity to hook into multicore computing’s promise"

The newness of many computer cores on one chip, known as multicore, is an IT opportunity for New Zealand says Nicolas Erdody.

“Learning how to interact with multicore technology through parallel processing is a critical priority around the world,” says the organiser of Multicore World Conference 2014.

“Programming applications that work well on 100 cores don’t scale to 10,000 or larger, which is where the machines are going now.”

Erdody says that the tools or basic techniques to use modern multicore petaflop machines are very scarce.

“The technology’s complexity, combined with a dearth of well-accepted tools and training options that makes parallel programming such a challenge for developers and computer architects is exactly the reason we’re holding this third conference in New Zealand,” he says.

“Our IT industry could be a world leader in developing new programming techniques to take advantage of this huge computing power which currently outstrips our ability to use it.”

Multicore World Conference 2014 is being held at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT) on February 25 and 26.

Presentations by a range of international speakers will provide knowledge and tools to help IT professionals and government and corporate decision-makers bridge the gap between multicore technology and its applications.

Among the speakers are Tim Cornwell, Architect of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA radio telescope, largest IT project in history), Cristina Cifuentes, Director of Oracle Labs Australia, Kent Winchell, Distinguished Engineer from the Office of the CTO of Cray Inc, and Professor Shaun Hendy of the University of Auckland.

Erdody says New Zealand can develop an ecosystem around multicore and parallel programming, helping to lead the world and be part of a profitable niche that few other countries seem willing to embrace. This is the context for Professor Hendy's presentation: “Get of the grass with Multicore”.

“We are keen to promote entrepreneurs who solve problems,” says Erdody.

“Such people will see plenty of opportunity at Multicore World 2014. We’re looking forward to seeing them there, and to the conversations and networking opportunities that will occur during its two days.”

ENDS

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