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TTR welcomes submissions on marine consent application

TTR welcomes submissions on marine consent application

Submissions to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) on TTR’s South Taranaki Bight marine consent application to extract iron sands in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the South Taranaki Bight closed on 28 January.

We thank all those who took the time to submit on our marine consent application. We as a company are reading and considering all of the submissions we have received.

Although we are still analysing submissions we note that submitters want to see a project that will bring benefits to the Taranaki community, and that their ability to enjoy the South Taranaki natural features will not be diminished.

Since its inception TTR has invested heavily in community consultation. We have communicated in good faith with a range of stakeholders in Taranaki. We will continue to listen to our stakeholders and share information in an open and transparent manner.

Our Board and Executive Management team remain committed to developing a project that delivers benefits to Taranaki and New Zealand as well as delivering a return to our shareholders. We would not progress this project if we were not confident that we could manage the associated effects and risks.

The Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 and the EPA’s hearing and assessment processes provide a robust framework in order to assess our project on its merits and to involve public feedback. TTR respects this framework and will carefully listen and respond to the concerns of stakeholders.

About TTR:
TTR is a private New Zealand company, established in 2007 to explore and develop the North Island’s offshore iron sand deposits. TTR is headquartered in Wellington and is funded by New Zealand and international investment. Since inception TTR has spent more than $50 million to understand the resource, engineering, marketing, studying the existing physical and ecological environment and identifying potential impacts to develop an iron sands extraction project which balances economic development while protecting the environment.


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