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G.J. Gardner to Help Build Successful Future for New Talent

G.J. Gardner to Help Build Successful Future for New Talent

New Zealand’s number one home builder, G.J. Gardner Homes, is launching an exciting series of educational and development schemes that aim to help those looking to secure a career in the building industry.

Starting imminently, the master franchise is introducing a Future Leaders Development Programme for G.J. employees across the country. It aims to encourage team members to reach their full potential by providing a structured training programme over a two year period.

In addition, the Rodney franchise holder for G.J. is establishing a local Rodney District scholarship to someone that is studying a relevant qualification in the building trade. As well, it is offering one local person the opportunity to be professionally trained, through an apprenticeship programme.

“G.J. Gardner Homes has been the number one home builder in New Zealand for the last decade – we recognise the overall performance of the company is directly related to the performance and skill level of not only our franchise holders, but the key individuals who make up their teams,” says Grant Porteous, Managing Director at the master franchise of G.J. Gardner Homes.

“By running the Future Leaders Development Programme, we aim to be able to provide opportunities to a range of people to help them in their future careers. For example, those that qualify from the programme could go on to fill a senior management role within a G.J. franchise or potentially be a future franchisee themself!”

Elaine Morley, franchise owner at G.J. Gardner Homes in Rodney, says: “This is an exciting time at G.J. - as we’re looking to help build for the future.”

“We need to ensure young people are getting access to the right training required. When we left school, we didn’t have to worry about being able to secure a job. Our young people are not as lucky. So, anything we can do to help them is really important, as it also ensures we have quality trained people coming through the ranks.


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