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Visitors the Winners with Single Cricket World Cup Visa

Visitors the Winners with Single Cricket World Cup Visa

Peak tourism industry groups in Australia and New Zealand have welcomed the news that cricket fans attending the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 will be granted entry into Australia and New Zealand with a single visa.

Tourism & Transport Forum Australia (TTF) and Tourism Industry Association New Zealand (TIA) have orchestrated a concerted campaign on both sides of the Tasman to simplify visa requirements for visiting cricket fans.

TTF Chief Executive Ken Morrison said this is a great outcome.

“This announcement means cricket fans will only have to secure a single visa to be able to see games on both sides of the Tasman,” Mr Morrison said.

“It will make the process simpler and cheaper, encouraging more visitors to travel to both Australia and New Zealand, benefitting the tourism sectors in both countries.

“We congratulate Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott and New Zealand Prime Minister John Key on this commonsense decision.

“The timing is perfect, too, with tickets to go on sale from next week.”

TIA Policy and Research Manager Simon Wallace said the decision will save fans time and money.

“With New Zealand to accept Australian visas for the duration of the tournament, visitors from countries like India and Pakistan will only have to apply and pay for one visa instead of two,” Mr Wallace said.

“It also means they only have to go through a single visa process, saving time and reducing hassle.

“This will make attending the Cricket World Cup easier and cheaper, streamlining the entire experience.

“I join with Ken in commending the Australia and New Zealand governments on their foresight in appreciating the mutual benefits this decision will bring.”

Mr Morrison also said he hoped today’s announcement was the precursor to further liberalisation of trans-Tasman travel.

“This shows what can be done with cooperation between the two governments,” Mr Morrison said.

“We already have a close relationship with New Zealand and reducing the barriers to travel between our two countries would serve to further deepen those bonds.

“Next year is also the centenary of the ANZAC landings at Gallipoli and we believe an agreement to further streamline trans-Tasman travel would be an ideal way to commemorate that important anniversary.”

ENDS

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