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Progress For Wool

Progress For Wool

Over 100 New Zealand wool industry members gathered in late January to listen to international wool leaders discuss the significant progress being made on a global scale by both the Campaign for Wool and International Wool and Textile Organisation (IWTO).

Peter Ackroyd the President of the International Wool and Textile Organisation (IWTO) and Chief Operating Officer of the Campaign for Wool and Ian Hartley, the Chief Executive of the British Wool Marketing Board shared the stage.

Ackroyd shared the background and benefits of the International Wool and Textile Organisation including internationally recognised procedures which are fundamental to trade and manufacturing, coordinated environmental standards, and standardising environmental “foot printing".

The pair informed guests that Campaign for Wool is making tremendous gains around the globe. Events such as Wool House, global Wool Weeks and have built incredible PR value in the northern hemisphere, where most wool is sold. Prince Charles is known to be proud of the Campaign for Wool work and has contributed to valuable partnerships with instrumental companies in countries like the US. Hartley recognised New Zealand's significant investment as one of the primary countries to be involved and invited the New Zealand campaign to contribute to the USA campaigns.

Following the presentations questions were raised about New Zealand's investments and activity while others praised the marketing efforts made to educate consumers and promote wool as a quality high-end product.

Philippa Wright, chairman of the new Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust attended the standing room only Napier event and shared positive conversations that followed.

"Many of the guests were motivated to get in behind such a positive Campaign and growers were asking how they can become more involved," she said. "Others commented that it was fantastic to get such a comprehensive insight into what IWTO have achieved and where they are heading."


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